Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was required to make a method to convert integer from base ten to some another base in JavaScript, and it should also support providing your custom digits array. For example,

toBase(10, 2 ["A","B"])// returns 'BABA'

and if digits array is not provided, it should work as JavaScript 'toString' method

var a = 10;
a.toString(2);//returns '1010'

I have wrote a function to convert an integer to another base from base 10 number, with an option of providing digits array -

function toBase(number, radix, digits)  
{
    radix = radix || 10;
    digits = digits || "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz".split("").slice(0, radix)

    if (radix > digits.length) {
        var msg = "Not enough digits to represent the number '" + number + "' in base " + radix;
        throw Error(msg);
    }

    if (number === 0) return digits[0];
    var a = []
    while (number) {
        a.splice(0, 0, digits[number % radix])
        number = parseInt(number / radix);
    }
    return a.join("");
}

This function works fine for me, but I want to know if is there any better way to do it? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The slice after the split is unnecessary, and instead of splice(0, 0, x) you should use unshift(x). – Bergi Jan 30 '13 at 13:41

You can just use the native toString method and then replace the output with those from the digits array:

function toBase(number, radix, digits) {
    if (digits && digits.length >= radix)
        return number.toString(radix).replace(/./g, function(d) {
            return digits[ parseInt(d, radix) ];
        });
    else
        return number.toString(radix);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is assuming radix is between 2 (necessary) and 36 (could be higher with own alphabet) – Paul S. Jan 30 '13 at 13:59
    
Oh, right. Then yours is quite fine. – Bergi Jan 30 '13 at 14:03
    
Thanks @bergi, I am going to use your implementation. – Moazzam Khan Jan 30 '13 at 15:14
    
In my case digits will be always '[0-9A-Z]' – Moazzam Khan Jan 30 '13 at 15:21

A method that might be slightly faster than the way you have is to bit shift. This works most easily when radix is a power of 2, here is an example

function toBase(x, radix, A) {
    var r = 1, i = 0, s = '';
    radix || (radix = 10); // case no radix
    A || (A = '0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'.split('')); // case no alphabet
    if (A.length < radix) throw new RangeError('alphabet smaller than radix');
    if (radix < 2) throw new RangeError('radix argument must be at least 2');
    if (radix < 37) return useBergisMethod(x, radix, A); // this is arguably one of the fastest ways as it uses native `.toString`
    if (x === 0) return A[0]; // short circuit 0
    // test if radix is a power of 2
    while (radix > r) {
        r = r * 2;
        i = i + 1;
    }
    if (r === radix) { // radix = 2 ^ i; fast method
        r = r - 1; // Math.pow(2, i) - 1;
        while (x > 0) {
            s = A[x & r] + s;
            x >>= i; // shift binary
        }
        return s; // done
    }
    return methodInOriginalQuestion(x, radix, A); // else not a power of 2, slower method
}
/*
toBase(74651278, 64, '0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzáé');
"4SnQE"
    // check reverse
var i, j = 0, s = '4SnQE', a = '0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzáé';
for (i = 0; i < s.length; ++i) j *= 64, j += a.indexOf(s[i]);
j; // 74651278, correct
*/
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure whether my method is "arguably faster", it uses about log_radix(x) function invocations in the replace… It was just shorter. Have you tested it? – Bergi Jan 30 '13 at 17:36
    
I didn't test it, no, but I'm pretty confident as number % radix requires a division, number / radix is a division, meaning that a lot of effort is required per character. My code is by no means optimised. – Paul S. Jan 30 '13 at 18:10
    
@Bergi yours could probably be sped up by using an object like o = {"0":0,"1":1,"2":2,"3":3,"4":4,"5":5,"6":6,"7":7,"8":8,"9":9,"a":10,"b":11,"c":1‌​2,"d":13,"e":14,"f":15,"g":16,"h":17,"i":18,"j":19,"k":20,"l":21,"m":22,"n":23,"o‌​":24,"p":25,"q":26,"r":27,"s":28,"t":29,"u":30,"v":31,"w":32,"x":33,"y":34,"z":35‌​} and looping rather than .replace doing string2 += alphabet[o[string[i]]]; – Paul S. Jan 30 '13 at 18:40
    
Yeah, though I optimized for readability/maintainability and not for speed/efficiency. Especially I did not want to hardcode that object (or any other map representation, like the OPs splitted string). – Bergi Jan 30 '13 at 18:45
    
Well you could avoid that object using string2 += alphabet[parseInt(string[i], r)]; some r where radix <= r <= 36 and still loop it maintaining readability, but using such an object is twice as fast – Paul S. Jan 30 '13 at 19:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.