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I frequently send files to Vim from Visual Studio. I have it set up as an external tool with the following parameter:

"+call cursor($(CurLine), $(CurCol))"

However, I also want to be able to call my own function as well. When I'm editing a file from VS I want the window to be large, so I expected to be able to do something like this:

"+call cursor($(CurLine), $(CurCol)); +call Embiggen()"

However, that doesn't work. I've tried a few variations (e.g. , call Embiggen(), etc).

Obviously I could write my own PlaceCursorAndEmbiggen function, but I don't really want to do that. Is there any way to call multiple functions on Vim startup?

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3 Answers

Eureka!

Simply pass two strings:

"+call cursor($(CurLine), $(CurCol));" "+call Embiggen()"
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Maybe the solution would have been easier to find had you used the alternative, more commonplace syntax: -c "cmd" instead of "+cmd". According to :help -c, you can pass up to 10 of these.

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These exact commands can be combined into one using pipe symbol:

"+call cursor($(CurLine), $(CurCol)|call Embiggen()"

. There are much more that can be combined this way, but some like :normal can’t, use @Ingo Karkat’s or your own answer for them. If you are short* on +commands and still don’t want to create a .vim file you can use either :execute

vim -c "execute 'normal! 1' | execute 'normal! 2'"

or (bash/zsh) -S with process substitution:

vim -S <(echo '
    normal! 1
    normal! 2
')

. Though most of time it is better to just create a .vim file.

* You can pass up to 10 + or -c (they are equivalent and they are not counted separately) and 10 other --cmd, though letter is less useful.

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