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I'm using a script that use jsonP to share cross domain information. It works well, but I need to put it inside an IIFE.

var domain = "http://example.com/";
var myObj = {
    recupData : function(data){
        if (data.id) {
            console.log(data.id);
        }
    },
    scriptTag : function() {
        var siteOrigin = domain+"check?q=myObj.recupData",
            script = document.createElement('script');
        script.type = 'text/javascript';
        script.async = true;
        script.src = siteOrigin;
        document.getElementsByTagName('HEAD')[0].appendChild(script);
    }
}
myObj.scriptTag();

That works! (I just took a very little part of my global script, just to show you the structure, so if there is any syntax error there, that's not the point).

But when I put this code in an IIFE, a self invoked function, I get some trouble.

(function(){
var domain = "http://example.com/";
var myObj = {
    recupData : function(data){
        if (data.id) {
            console.log(data.id);
        }
    },
    scriptTag : function() {
        var siteOrigin = domain+"check?q=myObj.recupData",
            script = document.createElement('script');
        script.type = 'text/javascript';
        script.async = true;
        script.src = siteOrigin;
        document.getElementsByTagName('HEAD')[0].appendChild(script);
    }
}
myObj.scriptTag();
})();

I get the error myObj is not defined, the error comes from the scriptTag method and I really don't understand why I can't access to this method until I have added an IIFE, it shouldn't change anything, It just avoids to pollute the global namespace. I think it's just a context problem, but I need an explanation.

share|improve this question
    
@apsillers Yes That's the good string, what do you mean when you tell my callback doesn't use myObj ? –  M4nch4k Jan 30 '13 at 14:02
    
Does the error come after the script is appended or before? Does the script code you're appending make reference to myObj? –  JAAulde Jan 30 '13 at 14:09
    
@JAAulde Yes the script tag is created before i get the error. I'm just creating an http request to get data from another server domain. –  M4nch4k Jan 30 '13 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The motivation for using IIFEs is that your variable names don't "leak" into the global scope. However, when you're using JSONP, you are obligated to expose at least one variable to the global scope so the loaded script can call it (or one of its methods). This loaded script is inserted as a separate script tag into the head, in a completely different scope and thus you can only share variables with it through the global scope.

For example, imagine that your call to http://mydomain.com/check?q=myObj.recupData produces a response like:

myObj.recupData({"id":123,"more":"stuff"})

This is being loaded inside a separate script tag, as if you'd written:

<script type="text/javascript">
myObj.recupData({"id":123,"more":"stuff"})
</script>

Clearly, if this call ought to work, myObj needs to be in the global scope so you should move its declaration outside of the IIFE, or explicitly register it on the window object:

// Global declaration
var myObj;
(function(){
    var domain = "http://mydomain.com/";
    myObj = { ... };
    myObj.scriptTag();
})();

// Registering on window
(function(){
    var domain = "http://mydomain.com/";
    // Also get it as a local variable
    // for a minor scope lookup optimization
    var myObj = window.myObj = { ... };
    myObj.scriptTag();
})();

The second option may be more interesting since it will always end up in the global scope, no matter where you place the snippet. If for some reason you end up nesting the first snippet inside another IIFE, you'd need to remember to move the myObj declaration as well, which can be cumbersome.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, thank you very much, I really never noticed that fact. So you don't think there is any way to avoid that my object must be global? For example, if you use the jQuery jsonP, you can include it in an IIFE. –  M4nch4k Jan 30 '13 at 14:21
1  
@M4nch4k Your callback doesn't have to be "global" in that it can be namespaced inside another object, but it does have to be accessible from the global scope. Even jQuery adds a callback to the global scope, named something like jquery1436746853 (I think it uses a timestamp?), but you simply don't see it because jQuery abstracts away your need to use it. –  apsillers Jan 30 '13 at 14:44
    
@M4nch4k jQuery creates a globally accessible function for your JSONP request which acts like a delegate and stores the results in a variable. It then retrieves those results using a data converter so your callback function gets the correct data. Since your callback is passed as a function (rather than a name), it doesn't need to be global and it keeps its scope. –  Mattias Buelens Jan 30 '13 at 15:05
    
So, if my whole script is contained in an IIFE, I need to put my function ou of my object and call it like window.scriptTag = function(data){}, to avoid to my main object to be global. –  M4nch4k Jan 30 '13 at 17:08
    
@M4nch4k If you don't want to expose myObj, you'll need to make a delegate function in the global scope but with local access to the myObj so you can still use it. For example: window.myJsonpDelegate = function(data) { myObj.doStuffWith(data); } If you need a lot of such delegates for a lot of JSONP requests, you might consider putting them in a separate namespace to reduce global cluttering. In any case, you'll need to put at least something in the global scope for the loaded script to access. –  Mattias Buelens Jan 30 '13 at 20:29

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