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I have some bitmasks that look like this:

namespace bits { 
  const unsigned bit_one    = 1u << 0; 
  const unsigned bit_two    = 1u << 1; 
  const unsigned bit_three  = 1u << 2; 
  ......
  const unsigned bit_ten    = 1u << 10; 
}

except that there are more bits and the names are actually meaningful flags for my program. But sometimes I remove bits, add bits, regroup similar bits, etc. Ideally I could do something like this:

namespace bits { 
  const unsigned bit_one    = 1u << COUNTER; 
  const unsigned bit_two    = 1u << COUNTER; 
  const unsigned bit_three  = 1u << COUNTER; 
  ......
  const unsigned bit_ten    = 1u << COUNTER; 
}

Is there some template / macro do automate this process? I know about __COUNTER__, but this is a header so if it gets included in some other source that uses __COUNTER__ too it may break. I'm working in a framework which is pre-C++11, so while upgrading my compiler will happen eventually, a solution that doesn't use C++11 would be ideal.

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1  
Automate what process? –  Peter Wood Jan 30 '13 at 14:03
2  
You didn't really show any sensible use-case. The example is useless. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 30 '13 at 14:04
    
@BartekBanachewicz, the routine loops over lots of data and assigns various flags to each entry. Then I store a bunch of unsigned ints to look up these flags later. –  Shep Jan 30 '13 at 14:11
    
"#define BIT(n) 1u << n", I think a more verbose explanation might be needed. Are you trying to dynamically creating constants from your code or do you want a mcro loop that defines 1u << 0 to 1u << 63? –  LastCoder Jan 30 '13 at 14:15
    
@LastCoder I want the later. Basically I'm looking for a set of unique constant bit masks, the ordering isn't important (so long as it's constant after I compile). –  Shep Jan 30 '13 at 14:19
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5 Answers

Why not use a macro with an argument?

#define BIT(n) (1 << (n))
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or BIT(x,n) (x << n) if 1 is not constant? –  crush Jan 30 '13 at 14:06
    
sorry, the question wasn't totally clear. I want BIT to increment each time I use it without having to type in n by hand. –  Shep Jan 30 '13 at 14:14
2  
An enumerated bit number will increment by 1, automatically (eg, bits numbered 0..32). Use a macro to convert the enumerated bit number into a mask which is what you actually want. –  Useless Jan 30 '13 at 14:16
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You can use the __LINE__ macro, which is part of standard C and C++. Use with caution and document your intent so that somebody else reading the code will understand.

#include <iostream>


namespace Bits
{
    const unsigned Base     = __LINE__ + 1;
    const unsigned BitOne   = 1u << __LINE__-Base;
    const unsigned BitTwo   = 1u << __LINE__-Base;
    const unsigned BitThree = 1u << __LINE__-Base;
}


int main(void)
{
    std::cout << Bits::BitOne   << '\n';
    std::cout << Bits::BitTwo   << '\n';
    std::cout << Bits::BitThree << '\n';
    return 0;
}
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Whoooo! Adding a line of comments to your program will actually break it! –  Lindydancer Jan 30 '13 at 16:31
    
This looks incredibly hackish and seems to go against all my C++ instincts, but comments won't actually break the program as @Lindydancer suggested, so long as everything using these bits recompiles together. Oddly this is the closest thing to a solution so far. –  Shep Jan 30 '13 at 16:44
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The following will do the trick:

#define NEXT_MASK(x)         \
    DUMMY1_##x,              \
    x = (1U << DUMMY1_##x), \
    DUMMY2_##x = DUMMY1_##x

enum {
  NEXT_MASK(one),
  NEXT_MASK(two),
  NEXT_MASK(three),
  NEXT_MASK(four)
};

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  printf("%x\n", one);
  printf("%x\n", two);
  printf("%x\n", three);
  printf("%x\n", four);
  return 0;
}

The program will emit:

1
2
4
8

The idea is that the first dummy enum steps up one step from the one before. The x is the mask, and the second dummy restores the value, so that the next macro will have a good starting point.

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The classic solution would be an enumeration of the fields:

enum foo_flags {
    alpha,
    beta,
    gamma,
    count
};

and then using either std::bitset<count> or the BIT macro as H2CO3 suggested:

BIT(alpha)
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Microsoft C++ has the

__COUNTER__

predefined macro, so you could...

#define NEXTBIT (1u << __COUNTER__)
namespace bits { 
  const unsigned bit_one    = NEXTBIT; 
  const unsigned bit_two    = NEXTBIT; 
  const unsigned bit_three  = NEXTBIT; 
}
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