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I have an application written in ExtJS 4.1.1, which uses one store a lot. I get data samples from server and after some validation I add it to the store using its "add" method. I do this periodically and I remove records I don't need from a store as well.

Problem is, my application is eating more and more of RAM over time and it seems that I have found the source of the problem, but I do not know how to handle it.

Here is my store definition:

this.store = Ext.create('Ext.data.Store', {
        fields: ['when', 'data1', 'data2', 'data3', 'data4', 'data5', 'data6', 'data7', 'data8', 'data9'],
        proxy: {
            type: 'memory',
            reader: {
                type: 'json',
                root: 'users'
            }
        },
        sorters: [{
            property: 'when',
            direction: 'ASC'
        }]
    });

And this is how I delete records from it:

var record = self.store.getAt(j);
if((record.get('when') <= newMinDate) && (record.get('data'+id) !==' ')) {
  self.store.remove(record);
  record.destroy();
  record = null;
  j--;
  ln--;
}

But when I checked the console when I was debugging this issue I could see, that records are in fact deleted from a store, but not from memory.

EDIT/UPDATE: I tried to fix the issue using advices in your answers, but neither could fix it. To be sure, that I got the problem source right, I extracted my store code to examine it more closely and see if it is really causing the problem. You can see the whole code below:

Ext.define('TestApp.App', {
extend: 'Ext.app.Application'
});

Ext.application({
extend: 'MyApp.app.Application',

store: null,

launch: function() {
    var self = this;
    self.store = Ext.create('Ext.data.Store', {
        fields: ['when', 'data1', 'data2', 'data3', 'data4', 'data5', 'data6', 'data7', 'data8', 'data9'],
        proxy: {
            type: 'memory'
        },
        sorters: [{
            property: 'when',
            direction: 'ASC'
        }]
    });
    self.beginTask();
},

beginTask: function() {
    var self = this;
    Ext.TaskManager.start({
        run: function() {
            var jsonRaw = *very large json*; //about 650 samples
            var json = Ext.JSON.decode(jsonRaw, true);
//                self.store.add(json.data.samples);
//                var ln = self.store.getCount();
//                for (var j=0; j<ln; j++) {
//                    var record = self.store.getAt(j);
//                    self.store.remove(self.store.getAt(j));
//                    j--;
//                    ln--;
//                    record.destroy();
//                    delete record;
//                }
            json = null;
            jsonRaw = null;
        },
        interval: 1000
    });
}
});

Now the strange part about this: memory leak is present even if the store part is commented like in code listing above. Did I made some mistake with task management?

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2 Answers

One of the many gotchas I've discovered using Ext JS is that Ext.data.Model#destroy doesn't actually clean up the record locally. The destroy method uses the store's proxy to send a destroy request for that record (if you needed to remove the corresponding record from a database, for instance). If that's your intended behavior, then no worries.

When you remove a record from a store, that store keeps a reference to that record in an array called removed. You can see it towards the bottom of the Ext.data.Store#remove method. I recommend using a JavaScript debugger and inspecting your store object after a few removes to see if your records are being cached. If they are, it's simple enough to call store.removed.length = 0; to clear it out.

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I've totally forgotten that array. +1 –  sra Jan 31 '13 at 14:02
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What happens if you do a store.sync() after the remove? Don't know if that helps for memory proxy, but it should remove references to removed records I think. Just doing a remove(record) on a record doesn't really remove the record, it just marks it for removal and stops exposing it as available in the store. At least that's true for other proxy types. The actual remove can only be performed after the store's modified records (add, remove, update) have been synced through store.sync();. That's when the store holds the records in their new state in it's internal list.

Perhaps sra is right anyway and you yourself hold a reference to the record in a closure somewhere else?

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