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I have a number of sed/perl/etc "one-liner" commands that I use frequently:

  • head -1 (Print the first line of a file)
  • sed $d (Drop the last line of a file)
  • perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)' (Number lines in a file)

You get the idea.

All of these commands have the same behaviour - they can take input from standard input, or work on a series of files whose names are passed as arguments. I'd like to wrap these common scripts up as Powershell functions, so that I don't have to remember the exact syntax to use. However, aliases don't work like that, and if I do the "obvious" approach with functions:

function numlines {
    perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)' $args
}

it works with files as arguments (numlines my_file.pl) but not with input from a pipe (cat my_file.pl | numlines).

Is there a way to write the function so that it works both ways?

To clarify - I can use bat files to do this. For example, numlines.bat containing

@perl -pe "$_ = qq($. $_)" %*

but having to invoke cmd.exe and the general ugliness of bat files (that "Terminate batch job (Y/N)?" prompt when you hit CTRL-C :-() makes me wish for a similarly simple solution within Powershell...


Based on Richard's suggestion below, I tried:

function test {
  [CmdletBinding()]

  param(
    [Parameter(mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipeline=$true)]
    $data
  )

  process {
    perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)'
  }
}

If I then do test file.txt (which I'd want to run effectively identically to perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)' file.txt) the function runs, but waits for data on standard input rather than processing file.txt. The same thing happens when I try cat file.txt | test - which I'd expect to act identically to cat file.txt | perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)'.

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I know this doesn't answer your original question but try wc -l to count the number of lines in a file. It'll take input from a pipe or you can specify the filename directly. –  Anew Jan 30 '13 at 15:16

2 Answers 2

Basics: Advanced Functions Can Do More than Standard Functions

Is there a way to write the function so that it works both ways?

Yes, using advanced functions, the process block will be called for each input object.

  • You need to specify [CmdletBinding] at the start immediately before the param block.
  • You need a parameter that will take pipeline input, this is done with the Parameter attribute on that parameter.

Like this:

function ReadInput {
  [CmdletBinding]
  param(
    [Parameter(mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipeline=$true)]
    $data
  )

  process {
    "Input was: $data";
  }
}

Better to Do Things Natively

head -1 (Print the first line of a file)

Look at the First parameter of Select-Object: ... | Select -f 1 | .... will just pass the first object through.

sed $d (Drop the last line of a file)

This one is harder... essentially a function that keeps track if there is another line.

perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)' (Number lines in a file)

You need Measure-Object, which without other parameters will count the number of objects it receives on the pipeline.


Why It Isn't Working

(Based on the expanded question)

There are two parts to this:

First: you need to pass the value of the parameter bound to the pipeline into you operation. So:

process {
  perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)'
}

should be

process {
  $data | perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)'
}

Second: this probably won't work for a lot of your utilities, because each time the process block is executed a new instance of the pipeline will be execute, including a new invocation of sed (etc.) for each object on the pipeline and thus losing any state your would normally expect it to maintain from one line to the next.

There are two routes around this. First you could use steppable pipelines, which is an advanced topic (and the only decent coverage is in the book Windows PowerShell in Action Second edition by Bruce Payette (who did most of the PSH language design and implementation)).

Second: do things natively. Eg. number of lines in a file (without using Measure-Object):

function Get-ObjectCount {
  [CmdletBinding]
  param(
    [Parameter(mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipeline=$true)]
    [object[]]$data   # Accept an array...
  )

  begin {
    $count = 0  # Not strictly needed: PSH will default this.
  }

  process {
    $count += $data.length
  }

  end {
    $count
  }
}

This will also be much faster (no need to create another process.

As long as you are focused on PSH as a wrapper you are going to find you are gettiong the worst of both worlds: losing the flexibility of the *ix type tools (PSH's execution model is different: cooperating tools in one process) and losing the flexibility of PSH (PSH works on typed objects not strings).

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Maybe I wasn't clear - those were examples. What I want is not to rewrite the code using Powershell, but simply to "wrap" the existing command line (unchanged!) in a function that acts as a named equivalent. It's what the Unix bash shell can do with aliases - alias firstline='head -1' but Powershell aliases can't do because they cannot take arguments. –  Paul Moore Jan 30 '13 at 16:27
    
@PaulMoore: See the first part of the answer (before the horizontal line): how to write functions that can take input on the pipeline or from parameters. –  Richard Jan 30 '13 at 17:03
    
@PaulMoore: What didn't work? (I suspect you might need to accumulate the input and pass it all to sed (each time you execute sed a new process will be created). –  Richard Jan 31 '13 at 9:32
    
I edited the question to give an example of what I'm doing based on your suggestion and what I'd expect (and what I'm actually seeing). –  Paul Moore Jan 31 '13 at 9:40
    
Thanks for the detailed explanation. Unfortunately, the approach fundamentally just does not work - adding "$data |" to the process block, pipes each line of the input to a separate instance of perl (so the line numbering example fails totally, as it numbers each line as line 1). Also, if I put a filename as an argument, Powershell treats the filename as the data to pipe in, rather than treating it as an argument to the command (That's what the %* is for in the bat file example). –  Paul Moore Jan 31 '13 at 16:45
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It appears that the key to the solution is to use $args (for the command line arguments) and $input (for the pipe input) together in the function, as follows:

function wrapper {
    $input | WRAPPED_COMMAND_HERE $args
}

So, for example, the case of the perl command to number lines looks like this

PS> function nl {
>>    $input | perl -pe '$_ = qq($. $_)' $args
>>  }
>>
PS> nl test.txt
1 This is some
2 test data
PS> type test.txt | nl
1 This is some
2 test data
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