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I have a base class that defines a generic method like this:

public class BaseClass
{
    public T DoSomething<T> ()
    { ... }
}

As this class is by a third-party and does not come with an interface, I am defining an interface that defines the actually needed methods from that class. That way I get loose coupling and can actually exchange that third-party class with something else. For this example, consider the following interface:

public interface ISomething
{
    T DoSomething<T> ()
        where T : Foo;
}

As you can see, it defines the same method but also applies a type constraint on the type parameter, which comes from some other requirements that are not relevant to this.

Next, I define a subtype of BaseClass which also implements ISomething. This class will be used as the usual implementation behind the interface–while the interface will be what the rest of the application will be accessing.

public class Something : BaseClass, ISomething
{
    // ...
}

As the DoSomething in BaseClass already supports any type parameter T, it should especially support a type parameter which is a subtype of Foo. So one would expect that a subtype of BaseClass already implements the interface. However I get the following error:

The constraints for type parameter 'T' of method 'BaseClass.DoSomething()' must match the constraints for type parameter 'T' of interface method 'ISomething.DoSomething()'. Consider using an explicit interface implementation instead.

Now, I have two possibilities; the first one is to do what the error suggests and implement the interface explicitely. The second is to hide the base implementation using new:

// Explicit implementation
T ISomething.DoSomething<T> ()
{
    return base.DoSomething<T>();
}

// Method hiding
public new T DoSomething<T>()
    where T : Foo
{
    return base.DoSomething<T>();
}

Both work, although I’d probably prefer the second solution to keep the method accessible from the class itself. However it still leaves the following question:

Why do I have to re-implement the method when the base type already implements it with a less-strict (read: none) type constraint? Why does the method need to be implemented exactly as it is?

edit: To give the method a bit more meaning, I changed the return type from void to T. In my actual application, I have both generic arguments and return values.

share|improve this question
1  
Is having methods with the same signatures the same as implementing an interface? –  Jodrell Jan 30 '13 at 15:20
    
Same question is asked here stackoverflow.com/questions/4634989/… (although I'm not voting to close this one since it doesn't seem a consensus was reached in the original), personally I'm partial to Hans Passant's response there but really you're probably going to need someone like Lippert to weigh in if you want a definitive answer –  heisenberg Jan 30 '13 at 15:25
    
Why do the signatures have to match? Because something that is referencing an instance of Something as BaseClass could attempt to call DoSomething with a type paramater that does not inherit Foo. –  Ginosaji Jan 30 '13 at 15:27
    
@Ginosaji: And what would be the problem with that? –  Jon Jan 30 '13 at 15:27
    
Doing so would violate the Foo constraint on ISomething. It's difficult to demonstrate with your example because it's just an action. But imagine DoSomething<T> returned an instance of T. How would you guarantee that the return value of DoSomething<T> inherited from Foo? –  Ginosaji Jan 30 '13 at 15:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Certainly the given code could be compiled and run safely:

When a Something instance is typed as Something or as BaseClass the compiler would allow any type for T, while when the same instance is typed as ISomething it would allow just types inheriting Foo. In both cases you get static checking and runtime safety as usual.

In fact, the above scenario is exactly what happens when you implement ISomething explicitly. So let's see what arguments we can make for and against the current state of affairs.

For:

  • the proposed solution would not be applicable to all cases; it depends on the exact method signatures (is the type argument covariant? contravariant? invariant?)
  • it doesn't require the specification to be amended with new text stating how such cases are handled
  • it makes the code self-documenting -- you don't have to learn said text; the current rules regarding explicit interface implementation are enough
  • it does not impose development costs on the C# compiler team (documentation, feature implementation, testing, etc)

Against:

  • you need to type more

Considering the above and additionally the fact that this is not an everyday scenario, IMHO the conclusion to be reached is clear: this might be nice to have, but it certainly doesn't warrant going out of your way to implement it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for actually trying to answer the why :) I understand that it would involve some effort to get this working in the language, but then again that is true for every new language feature. But I also understand that this is a rare use case, and both explicit implementation and method hiding solve it just fine. It was just odd to stumble on this, as I actually expected it to work. — Do you have any example for me where contravariance of the type argument applies? This is also somewhat related to the comment by @Ginosaji in the question comments (see also my reply there). –  poke Jan 30 '13 at 16:48

You can get what you want with the code below. By including the type parameter in the interface defenition you can make it covariant which seems to satisfy the compiler. The Base class remains untouched and you are able to shadow the Base implementation and implement the interface with a single method.

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var something = new Something<Foo>();
        var baseClass = (BaseClass)something;
        var isomething = (ISomething<Foo>)something;

        var baseResult = baseClass.DoSomething<Bar>();
        var interfaceResult = isomething.DoSomething<Bar>();
        var result = something.DoSomething<Bar>();
    }
}

class Foo 
{
}

class Bar : Foo
{
}

class BaseClass
{
    public T DoSomething<T>()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
}

interface ISomething<out T> where T : Foo
{
    T DoSomething<T>();
}

class Something<T> : BaseClass, ISomething<T> where T : Foo
{
    public new T DoSomething<T>()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
}

Or if you really don't want to specify Foo in the instantiation

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var something = new Something();
        var baseClass = (BaseClass)something;
        var isomething = (ISomething)something;

        var baseResult = baseClass.DoSomething<Bar>();
        var interfaceResult = isomething.DoSomething<Bar>();
        var result = something.DoSomething<Bar>();
    }
}

class Foo 
{
}

class Bar : Foo
{
}

class BaseClass
{
    public T DoSomething<T>()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
}

interface ISomething
{
    T DoSomething<T>;
}

interface ISomething<S> : ISomething where S : Foo
{
    new R DoSomething<R>() where R : Foo;
}

class Something : BaseClass, ISomething
{
    public new T DoSomething<T>()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Unfortunately I do need the generic methods and cannot instantiate the object depending on which type I need to operate on (i.e. the Doer or Something class is not generic itself). –  poke Jan 30 '13 at 16:33
    
@poke, as you can see in my extended answer, you can instantiate it based on Foo, not the type you need it to operate on. Since you must know Foo already to place the constraint on the interface I believe this satisfies your requirement. –  Jodrell Jan 30 '13 at 16:48
    
@poke or with a bit of indirection that can be avoided at a cost. –  Jodrell Jan 30 '13 at 17:30
    
Wow, that’s pretty cool, I need to try that out! –  poke Jan 30 '13 at 20:26

Try using composition instead of inheritance to implement Something:

public class Something : ISomething
{
    private readonly BaseClass inner = ...;

    void DoSomething<T>() where T : Foo
    {
        inner.DoSomething<T>();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This cannot be a general solution, it has lots of problems (e.g. is not a BaseClass, requires keeping duplicate state, has no access to protected members, etc). –  Jon Jan 30 '13 at 15:47
1  
@Jon Understood about the limitations. But if the OP wants loose coupling, there's no need for it to be a BaseClass, in fact it shouldn't be. To access protected members, he can extend it and widen access to the members, then wrap an instance of that class instead (crufty, I realize). Don't see where the duplicate state you mentioned is though. –  Paul Bellora Jan 30 '13 at 16:00
    
Assuming that BaseSomething has state, in such scenarios you can easily be forced to duplicate it. Anyway my point is about the general case (and only because you offered a concrete solution -- there are lots of unknowns here). –  Jon Jan 30 '13 at 16:07
    
I agree that composition can be useful to solve this, but it’s not really a good solution for me. Only a few of the methods defined in the interface are conflicting with the methods defined in BaseClass, so composing it would mean to replicate every single method. And as Jon said, I would lose the ability to access protected members which is necessary with the current implementation. As such explicitely implementing the interface or hiding methods is more appropriate for me. — Btw. I do realize that I left a lot unknowns, but that was intended as I am more interested in the general case. –  poke Jan 30 '13 at 16:39

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