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I have this SML code. I don't know why I cannot compile this :

fun score = 
    let
       val sum = 3; (* error at this line : SYNTAX ERROR : inserting LPAREN *)
       if sum div 2 > 0
       then sum = 0
       else sum = 1
       (*some other code*)
    in
       sum (* I want to return sum after some steps of calculation *)
    end
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1  
Perhaps you wan't to elaborate on what you wan't to do with the code. It makes absolutely no sense, as it is now. –  Jesper.Reenberg Jan 30 '13 at 16:27
1  
It seems to me that beyond mere syntax issues, he is actually trying to assign to sum in the conditional. But of course, there is no such thing as assignment to a value, identifiers are not mutable in SML (or other functional languages). –  Andreas Rossberg Jan 30 '13 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are more issues with your code, than jacobm points out.
You are also missing a function argument. Functions in SML always takes one argument. For example

fun score () = 
    let val sum = 3
        val sum = if sum div 2 > 0
                  then sum = 0
                  else sum = 1
    in
       sum
    end

However this still doesn't make much sense. since the expressions sum = 0 and sum = 1 evaluates to a Boolean.

A let-expression is used to make some local declarations which are only visible inside the in ... end part. Thus the calculations you wan't to do with sum, should probably be done inside the in ... end part, unless you wan't to express it as a means of a function.

One such example is

fun score () = 
    let val sum = 3
    in
      if sum div 2 > 0
      then ...
      else ...
    end

If we look at the syntax of a let-expression, it probably makes more sense

let
  <declaration>
in
  <expr> ; ... ; <expr>
end

Since if-then-else is an expression, it can't be in the "declarations part" by itself.

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Good point --- I fixed the first error and didn't really read the rest of the code :) –  jacobm Jan 30 '13 at 16:29

That syntax just isn't legal -- in between let and in all you're allowed to have is a series of val name = expr fragments. You can do this, though:

fun score = 
    let val sum = 3
        val sum = if sum div 2 > 0
                  then sum = 0
                  else sum = 1
    in
       sum
    end

I would consider it a bit of a weird style to use sum for both variable names, but it's legal.

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