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For lack of a better word, how do I apply a "patch" to a R data.frame? Suppose I have a master database with firm and outlet columns and an ownership shares variable that is 1 or 0 in this example, but could be any percentage.

// master
     firm outlet shares.pre
1    five      1          0
2     one      1          1
3     red      1          0
4  yellow      1          0
5    five      2          0
6     one      2          0
// many more

I want to let firm "one" sell outlet "1" to firm "red", which transaction I have in another data.frame

// delta
  firm outlet shares.delta
1  one      1         -1
2  red      1          1

What is the most efficient way in R to apply this "patch" or transaction to my master database? The end result should look like this:

// preferably master, NOT a copy
     firm outlet shares.post
1    five      1          0
2     one      1          0  <--- was 1
3     red      1          1  <--- was 0
4  yellow      1          0
5    five      2          0
6     one      2          0
// many more

I am not particular about keeping the suffixes pre, post or delta. If they were all named shares that would be fine too, I simply want to "add" these data frames.

UPDATE: my current approach is this

update <- (master$firm %in% delta$firm) & (master$outlet %in% delta$outlet)
master[update,]$shares <- master[update,]$shares + delta$shares

Yes, I'm aware it does a vector scan to creat the Boolean update vector, and that the subsetting is also not very efficient. But the thing I don't like about it most is that I have to write out the matching columns.

share|improve this question
    
Efficient in terms of speed or code length? –  Ari B. Friedman Jan 30 '13 at 16:16
    
@AriB.Friedman preferably both, but code length is more important (the database is about 100 lines long, it's a firm-level database, not a high-frequency stock market trading thing) –  TemplateRex Jan 30 '13 at 16:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another way using data.table. Assuming you've loaded both your data in df1 and df2 data.frames,

require(data.table)
dt1 <- data.table(df1)
dt2 <- data.table(df2)
setkey(dt1, firm, outlet)
setkey(dt2, firm, outlet)
dt1 <- dt2[dt1]
dt1[is.na(dt1)] <- 0
dt1[, shares.post := shares.delta + shares.pre]

#      firm outlet shares.delta shares.pre shares.post
# 1:   five      1            0          0           0
# 2:   five      2            0          0           0
# 3:    one      1           -1          1           0
# 4:    one      2            0          0           0
# 5:    red      1            1          0           1
# 6: yellow      1            0          0           0
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 tnx! Is there any way I can avoid creating an out copy of my original data frame? I would prefer to directly update dt1. –  TemplateRex Jan 31 '13 at 10:22
    
just replace out with dt1. Check my edit. –  Arun Jan 31 '13 at 10:37
    
I like the data.table syntax, but I guess the assignment will scan over all entries of the master database? Is this more efficient than my current approach (see updated question)? –  TemplateRex Jan 31 '13 at 10:40
    
Nope. it's by reference. Read about ?':=' from the documentation. It reads Fast add, remove and modify subsets of columns, by reference. –  Arun Jan 31 '13 at 10:42
1  
Tnx, much appreciated, will read up on data.table. –  TemplateRex Jan 31 '13 at 10:48

I'd give a more precise answer if you had provided a reproducible example, but here's one way:

  • Call your first data.frame dat and your second chg

Then you could merge the two:

dat <- merge(dat,chg)

And just subtract:

dat$shares <- with(dat, shares.pre + shares.delta )
share|improve this answer
    
+1 tnx! but this does not apply the changes to my orginal dat, how can I do that? –  TemplateRex Jan 31 '13 at 10:23

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