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I have the following tables (irrelevant things removed):

create table Payment (
    id int not null auto_increment,
    status int not null,
    primary key(id)
);
create table Booking (
    id int not null auto_increment,
    paymentId int not null,
    nrOfPassengers int not null,
    primary key(id),
    key paymentFK (paymentId),
    constraint paymentFK foreign key (paymentId) references Payment(id)
);

Booking contains ~456k rows and Payment contains ~331k rows. The following query takes 0.06s and returns 97 rows:

select * from Booking b
join Payment p on b.paymentId = p.id
where p.status = 3

If I add an order by clause, the query instead takes 4.4s, almost 100 times slower:

select * from Booking b
join Payment p on b.paymentId = p.id
where p.status = 3
order by b.nrOfPassengers

EXPLAIN for the first query:

id, select_type, table, type, possible_keys, key,       key_len, ref,  rows,   Extra
1,  SIMPLE,      p,     ALL,  PRIMARY,       NULL,      NULL,    NULL, 331299, Using where
1,  SIMPLE,      b,     ref,  paymentFK,     paymentFK, 9,       p.id, 1,      Using where

and for the second:

id, select_type, table, type, possible_keys, key,       key_len, ref,  rows,   Extra
1,  SIMPLE,      p,     ALL,  PRIMARY,       NULL,      NULL,    NULL, 331299, Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort
1,  SIMPLE,      b,     ref,  paymentFK,     paymentFK, 9,       p.id, 1,      Using where

I use MySQL 5.1.34.

The where clause used in the query filters out the vast majority of rows from Payment. I get the impression that MySQL sorts the result set before filtering it with the (highly selective) where clause. Am I right in this? If so, why does it do this? I've tried analyzing both tables, but with no change in the query plans.

share|improve this question
    
do you have an index defined? –  Andreas Grapentin Jan 30 '13 at 16:31
    
I'm a little surprised that paymentid is not a component of booking's PRIMARY KEY. –  Strawberry Jan 30 '13 at 16:34
    
Definitely puzzling. Could it be possibly you are reaching a RAM limit causing virtual memory to kick in? –  ron tornambe Jan 30 '13 at 16:38
1  
define an index on column status, then try again –  ajreal Jan 30 '13 at 19:43

2 Answers 2

First, make sure you have the appropriate indexes on your tables. Assuming you do and it's still slower than expected, you could throw your results in a subquery without ordering them, and then add the ORDER BY clause back:

SELECT * 
FROM (
   select * from Booking b
   join Payment p on b.paymentId = p.id
   where p.status = 3
)
ORDER BY nrOfPassengers

I'm not sure how much (or if) this will help as when I view the execution plan it adds a row, but it like it could be quicker.

Good luck.

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1  
How do you think your query might help? Your train of thought is actually very interesting. –  newtover Feb 1 '13 at 11:45

I have a suspicion, that the problem is that among irrelevant things you removed there is a TEXT or BLOB column which makes MySQL go ondisk to store the intermediate result from the temporary table.

In any case, what we see from the execution plan: For each row from the Payment table, fetch it from disk, check condition, if it is true for each matching row in Booking put result in a temporary table. Sort the whole table with all the data by nrOfPassengers and output. In case, there are Text or Blob fields, the intermediate table is stored and sorted on disk, since MySQL can not predict the size of the table.

What you can do (as usual) is to minimize disk operations. As @ajreal suggested, add an index on status column. If it is so selective, you won't need any other indexes, but if you extend your paymentFK to (paymentId, nrOfPassengers) it will be even better. Now rewrite the query as follows:

SELECT p.*, b.*
FROM (
  select p.id as paymentId, b.id as bookingId
  from Booking b
  join Payment p on b.paymentId = p.id
  where p.status = 3
  order by b.nrOfPassengers
) as ids
JOIN Payment p ON ids.paymentId = p.id
JOIN Booking b ON ids.bookingId = b.id;

The data will be output in the subquery order.

share|improve this answer
    
The table does not contain any TEXT or BLOB columns. Only VARCHAR, INT, BIGINT, DECIMAL, BIT and DATETIME. However, adding an index on status made both the original query and your query instant. I still can't say I understand why the order by had such an impact on the performance of the original query. –  Viktor Dahl Feb 6 '13 at 8:17
1  
@ViktorDahl, the first query does not require a temporary table to store data before sorting, and can not predict the size of the table in the second query, because there is no statistics how many rows with p.status=3 there are. –  newtover Feb 6 '13 at 9:02

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