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I'm very new to C# and OOP and stackoverflow. This is my first scenario (a few questions)

I want the user to enter characters, until a period (.) is received, and to count and report the number of whitespaces.

Can I achieve this? (Not sure if you always hit to hit enter/return to send)

Can I do this without using strings? (I haven't covered strings yet, this is a self-learning exercise, and I believe the solution should therefore be very simple, but I'm getting unusual results).

I tried the following, but the program closes before I can see the results, even though I added a Console.Read(); at the end, which usually works...

class CountSpaces
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter characters,finish with a period (\".\"");
            char ch;
            int spaces=0;
            do
            {
                ch = (char)Console.Read();                
                if (ch == ' ')
                {                 
                    spaces++;
                }
            } while (ch != '.');

            Console.WriteLine("Number of spaces counted = {0}",spaces);
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
One thing you should do is familiarize yourself with the Visual Studio debugger. There are tons of resources online, but the first thing you can try is setting a breakpoint on a line where you know what is happening. You can do this by hitting F9 on that line, click Debug>Toggle breakpoint, or clicking in the left margin. You can use F10 to step through the code, and hover over variables to see what is happening in your program –  Gray Jan 30 '13 at 16:38

6 Answers 6

Use Console.ReadKey() instead of Console.Read().

  • Console.ReadKey() returns if a key has been pressed between after you called Console.ReadKey().
  • Console.Read() reads the character as in a stream (not useful at all in your case).

To get the char received by ReadKey, use : ch = Console.ReadKey().KeyChar;

share|improve this answer

You want ReadKey rather than Read. The latter just reads the next character if it exists on the stream and returns -1 if it doesn't as it won't wait (and you probably aren't typing that fast!)

share|improve this answer

If all you want is to see the result you just use ReadKey instead:

class CountSpaces
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Enter characters,finish with a period (\".\"");
        char ch;
        int spaces = 0;
        do
        {
            ch = (char)Console.Read();
            if (ch == ' ')
            {
                spaces++;
            }
        } while (ch != '.');

        Console.WriteLine("Number of spaces counted = {0}", spaces);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

However I think the program becomes more interesting if you update it to the following:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        while (true)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter characters,finish with a period (\".\"");
            char ch;
            int spaces = 0;
            do
            {
                ch = (char)Console.Read();
                if (ch == ' ')
                {
                    spaces++;
                }
            } while (ch != '.');

            Console.WriteLine("Number of spaces counted = {0}", spaces);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

My example uses Console.ReadKey instead of Console.Read:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int spaces = 0;
        char key;
        while ((key = Console.ReadKey().KeyChar) != '.') {
            if (key == ' ')
                spaces++;
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.WriteLine("Number of spaces: {0}", spaces);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If we create a helper method that creates a sequence of keys from the console:

public static IEnumerable<char> ReadKeys()
{
    while (true)
    {
        yield return Console.ReadKey().KeyChar;
    }
}

It allows us to write a query describing exactly what you want:

var spaces = ReadKeys()
    .TakeWhile(c => c != '.')
    .Count(c => c == ' ');

Take characters until you get a period, and count the number of spaces.

share|improve this answer
    
Lots of presumably valid illustrations of how this can be implemented, and I'm very grateful (and pleasantly surprised! thanks!) I'd like to develop this concept further in my mind. var is new to me (runtime type declaration?) and I can't quite see how this would fit in with the rest... can you provide the full implementation of this idea? Are Takewhile and Count class methods? –  user2026123 Jan 31 '13 at 0:15

Use Console.ReadKey() to get ConsoleKeyInfo. Then verify pressed Key. You don't need to work with characters:

int spaces = 0;
ConsoleKey key;
do
{
    key = Console.ReadKey().Key;
    if (key == ConsoleKey.Spacebar)
        spaces++;
}
while (key != ConsoleKey.OemPeriod);

Console.WriteLine("Number of spaces counted = {0}",spaces);

Keep in mind that period key on NumPad has value ConsoleKey.Decimal. So, if you need to handle both period keys, you should write following condition:

while (key != ConsoleKey.OemPeriod && key != ConsoleKey.Decimal);
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