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I have a project using cocos2d-x library that contains a lot of classes. I have a .h file contains a global vector. I want to initialize it when the program starts in an intro page class. Intro page class has a graphical surface and a loader. Then I want to use that vector in my main class. The global vector's code is like bellow:

//globals.h
#ifndef _GLOBAL_H
#define _GLOBAL_H
#include <vector>

vector<int> a;
#endif

I am using push_back in intro page class. I have used extern and static keywords. my program makes a runtime linker error and it say your vector have been declared in appDelegate class (base class of cocos2d). when I put a static keyword behind it, it don't give me that linker error but it don't work correctly.
how can I correct this error? if you have another idea instead of this one, please share it. thank you.

share|improve this question
    
extern keyword –  BoBTFish Jan 30 '13 at 16:49
    
I'm working in a code base now that has hundreds of randomly strewn globals all over the place. There are extern keywords everywhere and it's very ugly. Use a class to wrap your global as a static member variable or at the very least, isolate it to a header file as is suggested by Rob below. Global/extern pairs are not elegant IMHO. –  Aeluned Jan 30 '13 at 17:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should have a design like the following:

shared.cpp

vector<int> a;

shared.h

extern vector<int> a;

somewhere.cpp

#include "shared.h"
void code() {
  a.push_back(10);
}

Mind that, since you are using C++, you can uses classes as namespaces to avoid cluttering the global namespace, eg:

shared.cpp

vector<int> Common::a;

shared.h

class Common {
  public:
    static vector<int> a;
}

somewhere.cpp

#include "shared.h"
void code() {
  Common::a.push_back(10);
}
share|improve this answer

You may have multiple declarations of an object, but you should only have one definition. To accomplish this, use extern to mark the declarations and the lack of extern to mark the definition.

In your header file, do this:

extern std::vector<int> a;

In exactly one of your source code files, do this:

std::vector<int> a;
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