Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working with large files , beginning from 10Gb. I'm loading the parts of the file in the memory for processing. Following code works fine for smaller files (700Mb)

 byte[] byteArr = new byte[layerPixelCount];
 using (FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(recFileName))
    {
        using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(fs))
        {
            fs.Seek(offset, SeekOrigin.Begin);

            for (int i = 0; i < byteArr.Length; i++)
            {
                byteArr[i] = (byte)(br.ReadUInt16() / 256);
            }
         }
    }

After opening a 10Gb file, the first run of this function is OK. But the second Seek() throws an IO exception:

An attempt was made to move the file pointer before the beginning of the file.

The numbers are:

fs.Length = 11998628352

offset = 4252580352

byteArr.Length = 7746048

I assumed that GC didn't collect the closed fs reference before the second call and tried

    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

but no luck.

Any help is apreciated

share|improve this question
2  
You've declared offset as an Int64 or long? –  itsme86 Jan 30 '13 at 16:59
    
@itsme86 thanks, that was the reason. I simplified the fs.Seek first argument to offset here. In my original code that was fs.Seek(a*b*c, SeekOrigin.Begin); a,b,c were integers, so the result of multiplication went negative and I didn't notice that. –  VadL Jan 30 '13 at 17:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm guessing it's because either your signed integer indexer or offset is rolling over to negative values. Try declaring offset and i as long.

//Offest is now long
long offset = 4252580352;

byte[] byteArr = new byte[layerPixelCount];
using (FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(recFileName))
{
   using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(fs))
    {
        fs.Seek(offset, SeekOrigin.Begin);

        for (long i = 0; i < byteArr.Length; i++)
        {
            byteArr[i] = (byte)(br.ReadUInt16() / 256);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.