Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've came across an article which discusses reimplementing dynamic_cast. The author claims a 20x 10x speedup. He provided his benchmark code in the reddit discussion. This is the benchmark:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <cstring>
#include <type_traits>
#include <ctime>

#define DEFINE_BASES(class, ...)                                                    \
    static hash_t GetClassNameHashStatic()                                          \
    {                                                                               \
        static hash_t classNameHash(HashString(#class));                            \
        return classNameHash;                                                       \
    }                                                                               \
                                                                                    \
    hash_t GetClassNameHash() const                                                 \
    {                                                                               \
        return GetClassNameHashStatic();                                            \
    }                                                                               \
                                                                                    \
    template <typename _empty>                                                      \
    void RegisterAllSubclasses() const                                              \
    {                                                                               \
                                                                                    \
    }                                                                               \
                                                                                    \
    template <typename _empty, typename T, typename... Args>                        \
    void RegisterAllSubclasses() const                                              \
    {                                                                               \
        T::RegisterAllSubclasses();                                                 \
        RegisterAllSubclasses<void, Args...>();                                     \
    }                                                                               \
                                                                                    \
    virtual void RegisterAllSubclasses() const                                      \
    {                                                                               \
        RegisterSubclass(static_cast<const void*>(this), class::GetClassNameHash());\
        RegisterAllSubclasses<void, __VA_ARGS__>();                                 \
    }

typedef unsigned int hash_t;

hash_t HashString(const char* str)
{
    const unsigned char* key = (const unsigned char*)(str);
    size_t len = strlen(str);
    hash_t h = 0;


    for (size_t i = 0; i < len; ++i)
    {
        h += key[i];
        h += (h << 10);
        h ^= (h >> 6 );
    }

    h += (h << 3 );
    h ^= (h >> 11);
    h += (h << 15);

    return h;
}

class Object
{
    public:
        static hash_t GetClassNameHashStatic()
        {
            static hash_t classNameHash(HashString("Object"));
            return classNameHash;
        }

        virtual hash_t GetClassNameHash() const
        {
            return GetClassNameHashStatic();
        }

        void* To(hash_t className) 
        {
            if (_bases.size() == 0)
            {
                BuildInheritanceCache();
            }

            auto result = _bases.find(className);
            return (result != _bases.end() ? (*result).second : NULL);
        }

        const void* To(hash_t className) const
        {
            if (_bases.size() == 0)
            {
                BuildInheritanceCache();
            }

            auto result = _bases.find(className);
            return (result != _bases.end() ? (*result).second : NULL);
        }

    protected:
        void RegisterSubclass(const void* ptr, hash_t className) const
        {
            _bases[className] = const_cast<void*>(ptr);
        }

        virtual void RegisterAllSubclasses() const
        {
            RegisterSubclass(static_cast<const void*>(this), Object::GetClassNameHash());
        }

    private:
        void BuildInheritanceCache() const
        {
            _bases.clear();
            RegisterAllSubclasses();
        }

        mutable std::map<hash_t, void*> _bases;
};

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

template <typename T>
T my_dynamic_cast(Object* ptr)
{
    return static_cast<T>(ptr->To(std::remove_pointer<T>::type::GetClassNameHashStatic()));
}

template <typename T>
T my_dynamic_cast(const Object* ptr)
{
    return static_cast<T>(ptr->To(std::remove_pointer<T>::type::GetClassNameHashStatic()));
}

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

class Base1 : virtual public Object
{
    public:
        int _base1;
        DEFINE_BASES(Base1, Object);
};

class Base2 : virtual public Object
{
    public:
        int _base2;
        DEFINE_BASES(Base2, Object);
};

class Base3 : virtual public Object
{
    public:
        int _base3;
        DEFINE_BASES(Base3, Object);
};

class Derived1 : public Base1, public Base2
{
    public:
        int _derived1;
        DEFINE_BASES(Derived1, Base1, Base2);
};

class Derived2 : public Base3
{
    public:
        int _derived2;
        DEFINE_BASES(Derived2, Base3);
};

class MostDerived : public Derived1, public Derived2
{
    public:
        int _mostDerived;
        DEFINE_BASES(MostDerived, Derived1, Derived2);
};

int main()
{
    Object*   o = new MostDerived;
    MostDerived* d;

    time_t t = clock();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; ++i)
    {
        d = dynamic_cast<MostDerived*>(o);
    }
    printf("%ul\n", clock() - t);

    t = clock();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; ++i)
    {
        d = my_dynamic_cast<MostDerived*>(o);
    }
    printf("%ul\n", clock() - t);

    delete d;

    return 0;
}

I've changed the format specifier to %ul in the printf because I believe that's the correct one.

I've tried the code and I've gotten different results depending on the compiler and optimization level:

g++, no optimization:

250000
1010000

g++, -O2 and -O3 both:

0
40000

clang++, no optimization:

270000 
790000

clang++ -O2:

240000 
60000

clang++ -O3:

240000 
70000

Why is the difference and how can I truly measure whether or not this method is faster?

share|improve this question
    
It may be faster in some cases (I haven't checked) but there is a significant overhead associated with this method, so I'm not sure it's actually useful –  lezebulon Jan 30 '13 at 17:11
2  
The only benchmarks that matter are those carried out at maximum optimization with debugging off; anything else is irrelevant. –  Jack Aidley Jan 30 '13 at 17:13
    
Doesn't look efficient to me: requires heap allocations with total of O(NM) memory where N is the number of instances and M is the size of the hierarchy. The dynamic_cast uses O(N+M) memory. Also the code does not handle ambiguous casts, like when you have two different sub-objects of the same type. –  ybungalobill Jan 30 '13 at 17:22
    
Without actually having looked at the code (will do so later though), I'd recommend being very careful in your expectations. Assume that compiler programmers are not complete idiots. If it was trivially possible to make it 10x faster, it would be that way. It's highly unlikely that someone comes up with an easy hack that does the same thing and is significantly faster, even more so as the built-in functionality re-uses the same information that RTTI and exceptions already need, whereas anything home-made necessarily needs extra store (so, more cache lines touched). –  Damon Jan 31 '13 at 12:07
1  
As for the actual question, no artificial micro-benchmark is meaningful, simply because it hides exactly such issues as cache effects and possibly over-emphasizes some other unknown effects. Write a real program that crunches for significant time (say, a MP3 encoder). If it encodes a 500MiB file with built-in dynamic_cast in 45 seconds and does the same with custom dynamic_cast in 35 seconds, you have a figure that is meaningful. –  Damon Jan 31 '13 at 12:11
show 3 more comments

closed as not constructive by Tamás Szelei, Shai, Jim Garrison, Ridcully, ecatmur Feb 3 '13 at 10:45

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.