Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created a number of threads. I know each threads name(suppose through an alien mechanism I set name of thread.) Now I am inside a thread and want to send a message to another thread.

I am trying to code a simulator of Pastry and Chord protocol. I can not have a number of distributed nodes, so I have created a number of threads. Now I want each thread send and receive messages from one another. I have set each nodes name as its IP(a randomly generated number). Now I do not know how to send a message from one node to another. Please tell me how to send a message from one thread to another if you know another threads name.

share|improve this question
3  
What have you tried? What research have you done? –  Gray Jan 30 '13 at 17:02
1  
Read Java Concurrency in Practice. –  Bruno Jan 30 '13 at 17:08
    
I tried to create a number of message queues. A message queue for a thread but ended in java.lang.NullPointerException. private static BlockingQueue[] queue; private static int queueNum = 0; public static void newQueue(String ip) { queue[queueNum] = new ArrayBlockingQueue(1024); try{ queue[queueNum].put(ip); }catch (InterruptedException e){e.printStackTrace(); } queueNum++; } –  ni30rocks Jan 30 '13 at 17:10
    
Be careful with what you're trying to achieve, if you're attempting to implement Chord, it is not analogous to inter thread communication, as it represent distribution across peers, not threads of a single process. At the very least you should be modelling this as entirely separate processes. –  codeghost Jan 30 '13 at 17:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest some kind of a message system. The easiest way would be to create a thread-safe FIFO and pass it into each thread. If you want to send messages directly to each different thread, make a "Topic" for each thread.

Don't try to hack something in using the thread name, it'll just constrain you later.

Pasted from comment so I can parse it:

private static BlockingQueue[] queue; 
private static int queueNum = 0; 
public static void newQueue(String ip) 
{
    queue[queueNum] = new ArrayBlockingQueue(1024); 
    try{ queue[queueNum].put(ip); }
    catch (InterruptedException e){e.printStackTrace(); } 
    queueNum++; 
}

Oh, I see your problem. You never assign BlockingQueue a value. Try changing that line to:

private static BlockingQueue[] queue=new BlockingQueue[10]; 

That will allow you 10 queues.

I'd also suggest that instead of an array you use a HashMap so you can name, add and delete queues at will. Instead of being queue[2] you'll be addressing queue.get("Thread1Queue") or something more descriptive.

Note response to comments: A HashMap can generally replace an array, it's lookup is nearly as quick but it uses anything for an index instead of numbers--Strings, enums, Objects, whatever you want (as long as it has the hash and equals methods overriden), but usually strings.

So if you are storing a bunch of queues, and you want to name them specifically, you can say:

HashMap queues=new HashMap();
queues.put("queue1", new ArrayBlockingQueue(1024));
queues.put("queue2",new ArrayBlockingQueue(1024));
...

Then whenever you want to access one you can use:

queues.get("queue1").put(new ThingToAddToArrayBlockingQueue())...

to put a "Thing to add" to queue1.

If you just want a "Bunch" of them and don't need to know which is which (Just a collection of threads that can be fed generic taskss) there are specific collections/patterns for that in the concurrent package.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to create a number of message queues. A message queue for a thread but ended in java.lang.NullPointerException. private static BlockingQueue[] queue; private static int queueNum = 0; public static void newQueue(String ip) { queue[queueNum] = new ArrayBlockingQueue(1024); try{ queue[queueNum].put(ip); }catch (InterruptedException e){e.printStackTrace(); } queueNum++; } –  ni30rocks Jan 30 '13 at 17:23
    
If I had about about 10000 threads, then is it good way to use a common message system. –  ni30rocks Jan 30 '13 at 18:16
    
Yes, although you would hit some system's thread limits at that point. I think I'd consider combining some of the threads into state machines or using a thread pool when you get over 2000. I made a highly threaded system at one point (Discover a class B network in 5 minutes) and found that too many threads really becomes an issue. With NIO I could have done the whole thing in a couple threads and had MANY more simultaneous requests in the network) –  Bill K Jan 30 '13 at 18:22
    
Concept of HashMap is new for me. I tried to read it but I am not able to understand how to use it here. Please explain with some example. –  ni30rocks Jan 31 '13 at 15:00

The usual way to communicate between threads is by passing an object to each thread which then allows to communicate between them. Keep in mind that all fields and methods of that object which are accessed by more than one thread should be synchronized.

But when you want to simulate a network protocol, then why not go all the way and use network sockets for interprocess communication? Just make each thread listen to a different socket on 127.0.0.1.

share|improve this answer
    
Using synchronized is causing all the issues. Mostly threads got deadlocked. And 2 of threads never replies. I have created an object of lock type to synchronize. Whenever some shared variable is accessed I use synchronize block command. –  ni30rocks Mar 19 '13 at 18:57

If you want to send messages and then have them processed by other threads you need a shared object (queue, map etc.) into which threads can pump messages. Receiving threads must check for incoming messages, pull them and do the necessary processing.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.