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If we have something like this:

public class test
   {
       public void Condition()
       {
           if (x == y)
           {
               methodOne();
           }
           else
           {
               methodTwo();
           }
       }
   }

How can I write a unit test with Rhino Mock to assert if methodOne gets called or not?

share|improve this question
    
where is methodone? – Cuong Le Jan 30 '13 at 17:29
    
assume that is define inside class test – wikinevis Jan 30 '13 at 17:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can leverage MethodOne as vitual method:

public virtual void MethodOne()
{
}

And use partial mock:

MockRepository mock = new MockRepository();

var mockTest = mock.PartialMock<Test>();
mockTest.Expect(m => m.MethodOne());

mock.ReplayAll();
mock.VerifyAll();
share|improve this answer

You don't usually create mocks for the class that you're testing. You create mocks for its dependencies.

So if your code were actually:

public class Test
{
    private readonly IFoo foo;

    public Test(IFoo foo)
    {
        this.foo = foo;
    }

    public void Condition()
    {
        if (x == y)
        {
           foo.MethodOne();
        }
        else
        {
            foo.MethodTwo();
        }
    }
}

... then it would make sense to create a mock for IFoo, and pass that to the instance of Test that you test against.

While partial mocks may allow you to test whether a method in the same class is called, it's something I'd generally steer clear of. Test whether you can see the effects of calling MethodOne or MethodTwo.

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