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I have UITableViewController with a UISearchBar as the tableHeaderView of its tableView. I also have a UISearchDisplayController initialized with that UISearchBar as its searchBar and that UITableViewController as its contentsController. So far so good, everything almost works.

The problem is that the UITableView has cells which have their accessoryType set to UITableViewCellAccessoryDetailDisclosureButton. Here's what happens:

  1. To start, everything looks as it should:
    enter image description here
  2. The user taps inside the UISearchBar.
  3. The UISearchDisplayController creates the dark overlay on top of the main table, and makes the index (as in, sectionIndexTitlesForTableView) of the main table disappear.
  4. Suppose the user at this point hides the keyboard (by pressing the iPad "hide keyboard" button on the standard keyboard)
  5. Since the user hasn't typed anything into the UISearchBar yet, we can still see the main table, albeit underneath the dark overlay added by the UISearchDisplayController.
  6. The hiding of the keyboard exposes more of the main table, causing the main table to load more cells.
  7. Now here's the problem: Since these cells are loaded while the index of the main table is hidden, the disclosure button is shown too far too the right (at least, compared to the other cells).
    enter image description here
  8. Moreover, when the user now cancels the search, those cells may not be reloaded causing the disclosure button to be shown underneath the index (which is now visible again).
    enter image description here

I'm at a loss on how to work around this; the only option I can think of is to find the UIView that corresponds to the disclosure button and manually move it, but that seems incredibly hacky, if only because even finding that UIView requires a nasty hack. Any suggestions on how to fix this in a nicer way would be much appreciated!

Minimal runnable example

Below is a minimal example. Just start a new XCode project, enable ARC, iPad only, and replace the contents of the AppDelegate with the below. Note that for the sake of the minimal example I force the main table to reload its cells in searchDisplayController:willShowSearchResultsTableView, otherwise the main table will cache its cells and the problem won't show (in my actual application the main table is reloading its cells for others reasons, I'm not completely sure why -- but of course it should be fine for the main table to reload cells at any time.)

To see the problem happening, run the code, type something in the search box (you will see "Search result 0 .. 5") and then cancel the search. The disclosure buttons of the main table are now shown underneath, rather than beside, the index.

Below is just the code:

@interface AppDelegate ()

@property (nonatomic, strong) UITableViewController* mainTableController;
@property (nonatomic, strong) UISearchDisplayController* searchDisplay;

@end

@implementation AppDelegate

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    self.window = [[UIWindow alloc] initWithFrame:[[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds]];

    // Override point for customization after application launch.

    UITableViewController* tableViewController = [[UITableViewController alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewStylePlain];

    UITableView* tableView = [tableViewController tableView];
    [tableView registerClass:[UITableViewCell class] forCellReuseIdentifier:@"Cell"];
    [tableView setDataSource:self];
    [self setMainTableController:tableViewController];

    UISearchBar* searchBar = [[UISearchBar alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 0, 44)]; // Width set automatically
    [tableView setTableHeaderView:searchBar];

    UISearchDisplayController* searchDisplay = [[UISearchDisplayController alloc] initWithSearchBar:searchBar
                                                                                 contentsController:tableViewController];
    [searchDisplay setSearchResultsDataSource:self];
    [searchDisplay setDelegate:self];
    [self setSearchDisplay:searchDisplay];

    [[self window] setRootViewController:tableViewController];

    self.window.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
    [self.window makeKeyAndVisible];
    return YES;
}

#pragma mark Table view data source

- (NSInteger)numberOfSectionsInTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
    if (tableView != [[self searchDisplay] searchResultsTableView]) {
        return 26;
    } else {
        return 1;
    }
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section {
    if (tableView != [[self searchDisplay] searchResultsTableView]) {
        return 10;
    } else {
        return 5;
    }
}

- (void)searchDisplayController:(UISearchDisplayController *)controller willShowSearchResultsTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
    // The problem arises only if the main table view needs to reload its data
    // In this minimal example, we force this to happen
    [[[self mainTableController] tableView] reloadData];

    [tableView registerClass:[UITableViewCell class] forCellReuseIdentifier:@"SearchCell"];
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    if (tableView != [[self searchDisplay] searchResultsTableView]) {
        UITableViewCell* cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"Cell" forIndexPath:indexPath];

        [[cell textLabel] setText:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%c%d", 'A' + [indexPath section], [indexPath row]]];
        [cell setAccessoryType:UITableViewCellAccessoryDetailDisclosureButton];

        return cell;
    } else {
        UITableViewCell* cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"SearchCell" forIndexPath:indexPath];

        [[cell textLabel] setText:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"Search result %d", [indexPath row]]];
        [cell setAccessoryType:UITableViewCellAccessoryDetailDisclosureButton];

        return cell;
    }
}

- (NSArray *)sectionIndexTitlesForTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
    if (tableView != [[self searchDisplay] searchResultsTableView]) {
        return [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"A", @"B", @"C", @"D", @"E", @"F", @"G", @"H", @"I", @"J", @"K", @"L", @"M", @"N", @"O", @"P", @"Q", @"R", @"S", @"T", @"U", @"V", @"W", @"X", @"Y", @"Z", nil];
    } else {
        return nil;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Please share the screenshot. –  Saurabh Shukla Feb 1 '13 at 18:59
    
Please provide code as well for the tableview. Cell creation/display, search code, etc... –  trumpetlicks Feb 1 '13 at 19:16
    
If you scroll down, then scroll back up again (after the incorrect displaying comes up, does the display come back to normal? –  trumpetlicks Feb 1 '13 at 19:20
    
May be a silly question but: why don't you just remove the dark overlay and make the index of the main table reappear upon closure of the keyboard? Or make it rebuild the list upon closure of the keyboard if the search query is blank? –  K'shin Gendron Feb 1 '13 at 19:24
    
@trumpetlicks: Have provided a minimal runnable example. Also, yes, after the search display controller is cancelled and we scroll the main table (causing it to reload those cells) the cells are constructed correctly again. –  edsko Feb 2 '13 at 9:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

If you are looking to mimic the way Apple's own apps seem to behave under these circumstances, then the correct course of action would be the cause the detail disclosure buttons to all move to the right when starting the search and then to all move back again once the search is complete.

I have achieved this myself in your example by calling reloadData on your main table view in two UISearchDisplayDelegate methods which I added to your code:

- (void)searchDisplayControllerWillBeginSearch:(UISearchDisplayController *)controller
{
    [[[self mainTableController] tableView] reloadData];
}

- (void)searchDisplayControllerWillEndSearch:(UISearchDisplayController *)controller
{
    [[[self mainTableController] tableView] reloadData];
}

This will force your detail disclosure views to be repositioned to take account of the visibility of the table view index, keeping the position of all disclosure indicators consistent with each other whether in search mode or not.

Update

I've toyed around with reloading the table view in other UISearchDisplayDelegate methods including:

- (void)searchDisplayController:(UISearchDisplayController *)controller didLoadSearchResultsTableView:(UITableView *)tableView
- (void)searchDisplayController:(UISearchDisplayController *)controller willUnloadSearchResultsTableView:(UITableView *)tableView

But these produce a rather jarring effect with the positions of the detail disclosure buttons jumping around abruptly so I'd recommend the willBeginSearch and willEndSearch methods as previously stated.

share|improve this answer
    
Aaah. Such an obvious solution. Very nice, thank you very much. Will award the bounty once StackOverflow allows it (in 5 hours). –  edsko Feb 2 '13 at 12:02

The easiest, and possibly cleanest, way that I can think of is to tell your viewcontroller (or view) to listen for keyboard events. Then when the keyboard is minimized you resign the first responder of the search bar and reload your tableview(if it doesn't already reload it properly).

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {
        //Your code here



        // register for keyboard notifications
        [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
                                                 selector:@selector(keyboardWillShow:)
                                                     name:UIKeyboardWillShowNotification
                                                   object:self.window];
        // register for keyboard notifications
        [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
                                                 selector:@selector(keyboardWillHide:)
                                                     name:UIKeyboardWillHideNotification
                                                   object:self.window];
    }
    return self;
}

-(void)dealloc
{


    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self name: UIKeyboardWillShowNotification object:nil];
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self name: UIKeyboardWillHideNotification object:nil];
}

And then add these two functions and do what you need in them.

- (void)keyboardWillHide:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    //searchbar resignFirstResponder

    //Tableview reload (if needed)
}

- (void)keyboardWillShow:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    //Don't really need this one for your needs
}

Since you are resigning first responder in the keyboardwillhide function (before the keyboard starts moving) your tableview cells should reload properly without you having to reload them again.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not how to detect when the cells are constructed incorrectly; for instance, I could check if the search display controller is active. The problem is what to do. –  edsko Feb 2 '13 at 9:25
    
The "what" to do is reload the table. It appears that the only time this problem happens is when the keyboard goes away (keyboardwillhide) while your search bar is still the first responder. The way to fix that is to make the search bar NOT the first responder whenever the keyboard goes away. Then when the tableview reloads it will position everything properly because the side navigation letters will be present. –  Putz1103 Feb 2 '13 at 15:33

The problem is not restricted to tables with section index titles. I had a similar problem with section header titles. If you add

- (NSString *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView titleForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
    if (tableView != [[self searchDisplay] searchResultsTableView]) {
        return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Section %c", 'A' + section];
    } else {
        return nil;
    }
}

to your "Minimal runnable example" program, then you will observe that the section header titles appear also in the search table view as soon as the main table view is reloaded. (The same problem was reported here: Removing Header Titles from a UITableView in Search Mode)

The only solution I know of is to avoid all updates to the main table view as long as the search display controller is active ([self.searchDisplay isActive] == YES) and reload the main table view only when the search table is unloaded:

- (void)searchDisplayController:(UISearchDisplayController *)controller  willUnloadSearchResultsTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
        [[[self mainTableController] tableView] reloadData];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Huh, that's really bizarre. I confirmed this even with using a completely separate object for the data source for the search table. It seems it's using the data source of the main table instead! –  edsko Feb 2 '13 at 12:16
    
@edsko: I think it is a bug that the section titles are re-displayed even if the search is active. As I said, I would just not update the main table view while the search is active, and reload it (if necessary) when the search table is unloaded. –  Martin R Feb 2 '13 at 15:23

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