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This question is about organizing the actual CSS directives themselves within a .css file. When developing a new page or set of pages, I usually just add directives by hand to the .css file, trying to refactor when I can. After some time, I have hundreds (or thousands) of lines and it can get difficult to find what I need when tweaking the layout.

Does anyone have advice for how to organize the directives?

  • Should I try to organize top-down, mimicking the DOM?
  • Should I organize functionally, putting directives for elements that support the same parts of the UI together?
  • Should I just sort everything alphabetically by selector?
  • Some combination of these approaches?

Also, is there a limit to how much CSS I should keep in one file before it might be a good idea to break it off into separate files? Say, 1000 lines? Or is it always a good idea to keep the whole thing in one place?

Related Question: What's the best way to organize CSS rules?

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1  
great question, generated great answers. Found a lot of useful stuff. Thanks. –  Sebastien Nov 15 '13 at 14:04

12 Answers 12

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Have a look at these three slideshare presentations to start:

Firstly, and most importantly, document your CSS. Whatever method you use to organize your CSS, be consistent and document it. Describe at the top of each file what is in that file, perhaps providing a table of contents, perhaps referencing easy to search for unique tags so you jump to those sections easily in your editor.

If you want to split up your CSS into multiple files, by all means do so. Oli already mentioned that the extra HTTP requests can be expensive, but you can have the best of both worlds. Use a build script of some sort to publish your well-documented, modular CSS to a compressed, single CSS file. The YUI Compressor can help with the compression.

In contrast with what others have said so far, I prefer to write each property on a separate line, and use indentation to group related rules. E.g. following Oli's example:

#content {
    /* css */
}
    #content div {
        /* css */
    }
    #content span {
        /* css */
    }
    #content etc {
        /* css */
    }

#header {
    /* css */
}
    #header etc {
        /* css */
    }

That makes it easy to follow the file structure, especially with enough whitespace and clearly marked comments between groups, (though not as easy to skim through quickly) and easy to edit (since you don't have to wade through single long lines of CSS for each rule).

Understand and use the cascade and specificity (so sorting your selectors alphabetically is right out).

Whether I split up my CSS into multiple files, and in what files depends on the size and complexity of the site and the CSS. I always at least have a reset.css. That tends to be accompanied by layout.css for general page layout, nav.css if the site navigation menus get a little complicated and forms.css if I've got plenty of CSS to style my forms. Other than that I'm still figuring it out myself too. I might have colors.css and type.css/fonts.css to split off the colors/graphics and typography, base.css to provide a complete base style for all HTML tags...

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Great slideshow links –  Phantomwhale May 19 '11 at 1:34

I tend to orgainize my css like this:

  1. reset.css
  2. base.css: I set the layout for the main sections of the page
    1. general styles
    2. Header
    3. Nav
    4. content
    5. footer
  3. additional-[page name].css: classes that are used only in one page
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+1 Great tip, thanks. –  Chuck Conway Jun 6 '10 at 5:48
    
If you're going to add CSS that's only used in one page, why not just put the css on that one page, without using a CSS file? –  user371699 Feb 13 '13 at 18:30
    
Oh god, why didn't i think of that? –  Sebastien Nov 15 '13 at 14:01
1  
@user371699 Some would argue that using <link> is more efficient than cluttering the HTML file up with a <style> tag. –  DylRicho Jan 30 at 8:35

However you find it easiest to read!

Seriously, you'll get a billion and five suggestions but you're only going to like a couple of methods.

Some things I shall say though:

  • Breaking a CSS file into chunks does help you organise it in your head, but it means more requests from browsers, which ultimately leads to a slower running server (more requests) and it takes browsers longer to display pages. Keep that in mind.
  • Breaking up a file just because it's an arbitrary number of lines is silly (with the exception that you have an awful editor - in which case, get a new one)

Personally I code my CSS like this:

* { /* css */ }
body { /* css */ }
#wrapper { /* css */ }
#innerwrapper { /* css */ }

#content { /* css */ }
#content div { /* css */ }
#content span { /* css */ }
#content etc { /* css */ }

#header { /* css */ }
#header etc { /* css */ }

#footer { /* css */ }
#footer etc { /* css */ }

.class1 { /* css */ }
.class2 { /* css */ }
.class3 { /* css */ }
.classn { /* css */ }

Keeping rules on one line allows me to skim down a file very fast and see what rules there are. When they're expanded, I find it too much like hard work trying find out what rules are being applied.

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FYI - I asked the the same question, in case you'd like to read more responses.

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Thanks, I'll take a look. –  Adam Bellaire Oct 6 '08 at 14:22

Factor out common styles. Not styles that just happen to be the same, styles that are intended to be the same - where changing the style for one selector will likely mean you'll want to change the other as well. I put an example of this style in another post: Create a variable in CSS file for use within that CSS file.

Apart from that, group related rules together. And split your rules into multiple files... unless every page actually needs every rule.

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I go with this order:

  1. General style rules, usually applied to the bare elements (a, ul, ol, etc.) but they could be general classes as well (.button, .error)
  2. Page layout rules applied to most/all pages
  3. Individual page layout rules

For any of the style rules that apply to a single page, or a small grouping pages, I will set the body to an id and a class, making it easy to target particular pages. The id is the base name of the file, and the class is the directory name where it is in.

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I've tried a bunch of different strategies, and I always come back to this style:

.class {border: 1px solid #000; padding: 0; margin: 0;}

This is the friendliest when it comes to a large amount of declarations.

Mr. Snook wrote about this almost four years ago :).

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The other day... Two years ago =) –  Oli Sep 28 '08 at 15:48
    
ha! indeed he did - interesting :) He must have linked to it from a recent article. or, maybe I'm just crazy. –  Nick Sergeant Sep 28 '08 at 15:50

As the actual ordering is a vital part of how your CSS is applied, it seems a bit foolish to go ahead with the "alphabetical" suggestion.

In general you want to group items together by the area of the page they affect. E.g. main styles that affect everything go first, then header and footer styles, then navigation styles, then main content styles, then secondary content styles.

I would avoid breaking into multiple files at this point, as it can be more difficult to maintain. (It's very difficult to keep the cascade order in your head when you have six CSS files open). However, I would definitely start moving styles to different files if they only apply to a subset of pages, e.g. form styles only get linked to a page when the page actually contains a form.

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CSS files are cached on the client. So it's good practice to keep all of your styles in one file. But when developing, I find it useful to structure my CSS according to domains.

For instance: reset.css, design.css, text.css and so forth. When I release the final product, I mash all the styles into one file.

Another useful tip is to focus readability on the rules, not the styles.

While:

ul li
{
    margin-left: 10px;
    padding: 0;
}

Looks good, it's not easy finding the the rules when you've got, say, 100 lines of code.

Instead I use this format:

rule { property: value; property: value; }

rule { property: value; property: value; }
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I used to worry about this incessantly, but Firebug came to the rescue.

These days, it's much easier to look at how your styles are interrelating through Firebug and figure out from there what needs to be done.

Sure, definitely make sure there's a reasonable structure that groups related styles together, but don't go overboard. Firebug makes things so much easier to track that you don't have to worry about making a perfect css structure up front.

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Here is what I do. I have a CSS index page with no directives on it and which calls the different files. Here is a short sample:

@import url("stylesheet-name/complete-reset.css");
@import url("stylesheet-name/colors.css");
@import url("stylesheet-name/structure.css");
@import url("stylesheet-name/html-tags.css");
@import url("stylesheet-name/menu-items.css");
@import url("stylesheet-name/portfolio.css");
@import url("stylesheet-name/error-messages.css");

It starts with a complete reset. The next file defines the color palette for easy reference. Then I style the main <div/>s that determine the layout, header, footer, number of columns, where they fit, etc... The html tags definses <body/>, <h1/>, <p/>, t etc... Next come the specific sections of the site.

It's very scalabale and very clear. Much more friendly to find code to change and to a dd new sections.

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6  
And it means browsers have to make 9 requests to the server before they can start rendering a page! Bare in mind that most browsers won't allow more than two connections to a server at a time! This is fine for dev, but you want to compress this into one file for production! Same goes for JS –  Oli Sep 28 '08 at 22:41
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link is much more efficient than @import. Yahoo YSlow rule #13 –  scunliffe Sep 29 '08 at 1:58

A recognised way of formatting your CSS is to use a Style Guide as a starting point and then customise it to suit your exact need.

One of the most common Style Guides is to break it down into defined groups:

/* Base */

/* Layout */

/* Modules */

/* State */

Base Contains reset and default element styles. It can also have base styles for controls such as buttons, grids etc which can be overwritten later in the document under specific circumstances.

Layout Would contain all the navigation, breadcrumbs, sitemaps etc etc.

Modules Contain area specific styles such as contact form styles, homepage tiles, product listing etc etc etc.

State Contains state classes such as isSelected, isActive, hasError, wasSuccessful etc etc.

That's the way I've done it for years and it makes it very easy to manage. Combine that with SASS or LESS and its super simple.

Chris

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