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I have a general rule which gives all DIVs a background image.
I have one div (with id='a') which I don't want it to have the background image.
What css rule do I have to give it?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 137 down vote accepted

Try:

div#a {
    background-image:none
}
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5  
Just use #a {}. Don't use element types in selectors unless necessary. –  Jezen Thomas Jul 18 '12 at 14:51
2  
"Avoiding unnecessary ancestor selectors is useful for performance reasons." Not really an issue when you are not Google. –  Davor Dec 26 '13 at 16:04
div#a {
    background-image: none;
}
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div#a {
  background-image: none !important;
}

Although the "!important" might not be necessary, because "div#a" has a higher specificity than just "div".

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The !important part is not necessary as the declaration with #a is more precise than a declaration of div and therefore this rule will be applied instead of the general div rule. –  Ruud v A Sep 22 '09 at 16:20
div#a {
  background-image: url('../images/spacer.png');
  background-image: none !important;
}

I use a transparent spacer image in addition to the rule to remove the background image because IE6 seems to ignore the background-image: none even though it is marked !important.

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3  
Who cares about IE6 these days. –  Rob W Oct 15 '12 at 14:00
    
-1 Your answer is incorrect. I started IE6, and the background-image:none; (with ot without !important) works flawlessly. –  Rob W Oct 15 '12 at 14:06
2  
Actually, I care - one of my clients has an isolated network environment with some specific software that hasn't been updated. IE6 is what they have to use. Sad but true :( –  Russ C Nov 2 '12 at 11:49
1  
Have an upvote to mitigate Rob W's downvote. It was quite rude of him to downvote just for backwards compatibility that isn't even a hack, regardless of if he could reproduce it or not –  Kavi Siegel Jun 19 '13 at 15:25

Since in css3 one might set multiple background images setting "none" will only create a new layer and hide nothing.

http://www.css3.info/preview/multiple-backgrounds/ http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-background/#backgrounds

I have not found a solution yet...

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I believe "background: none;" will override –  circusdei Aug 21 '13 at 20:51

If your div rule is just div {...}, then #a {...} will be sufficient. If it is more complicated, you need a "more specific" selector, as defined by the CSS specification on specificity. (#a being more specific than div is just single aspect in the algorithm.)

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Doesn't this work:

.clear-background{
background-image: none;
}

Might have problems on older browsers...

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Replace the rule you have with the following:

div:not(#a) { // add your bg image here //}
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