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I have the follow sample code:

type = 'Foo';

test = {
    type: {
        'fooVal': 'bar'
    }
}

alert(test.type.fooVal); // Bar
alert(test.Foo.fooVal); // TypeError: teste.Foo is undefined

How I can get the second alert to work?

I've tried:

test = {
    '"' + type + '"': {
        'fooVal': 'bar'
    }
}

But doesn't work.

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possible duplicate of javascript object, access variable property name? –  jbabey Jan 30 '13 at 18:15
    
@jbabey does not seen duplicated.. –  Gabriel Jan 30 '13 at 18:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use bracket notation to do the assignment instead:

type = 'Foo';
test = {};
test[type] = {fooVal: 'bar'};
alert(test.Foo.fooVal);

You can't use variables as keys when assigning via object notation.

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And when I have a JSON, how I can alert JsonObject.type.arrayKey? –  Gabriel Jan 30 '13 at 18:17
    
I don't really understand what you're asking –  Explosion Pills Jan 30 '13 at 18:43

You can't use an object literal if the key is defined by a variable.

type = 'Foo';

test = {};
test[type] = {
  fooVal: 'Bar'
};

alert(test.Foo.fooVal);  // Bar

[] on objects lets you access a property dynamically, for setting or getting.

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You don't have a property called Foo you have a property called type. You need to do something like this:

type = 'Foo';

test = {};
test[type] = {
    'fooVal': 'bar'
};

alert(test.type.fooVal); // Bar
alert(test.Foo.fooVal); // TypeError: teste.Foo is undefined
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