Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

We recently were forced to move to a new domain server half-way around the world. This may not seem like much of a change, but one of the processes that we run frequently has suddenly gone form a 2-second command to a 5-minute command.

The reason? We are updating the permissions on many directories based on a "template" directory structure.

We've discovered that XCOPY can update the majority of these settings in the same-old-two-second window. The remaining settings, of course, get left off.

What I'm trying to figure out is, how can XCopy do faster what .NET security classes should do natively? Obviously I'm missing something.

What is the best method for copying a directory's ACL information without pinging (or minimal pinging) the domain/Active Directory server?

Here's what I have:

    ... 

    DirectorySecurity TemplateSecurity = new DirectorySecurity(TemplateDir, AccessControlSections.All);

    ... 


    public static void UpdateSecurity(string destination, DirectorySecurity TemplateSecurity)
    {
        DirectorySecurity dSecurity = Directory.GetAccessControl(destination);

        // Remove previous security settings. (We have all we need in the other TemplateSecurity setting!!)
        AuthorizationRuleCollection acl_old = dSecurity.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(NTAccount));
        foreach (FileSystemAccessRule ace in acl_old)
        {
            // REMOVE IT IF YOU CAN... if you can't don't worry about it.
            try
            {
                dSecurity.RemoveAccessRule(ace);
            }
            catch { }
        }

        // Remove the inheritance for the folders... 
        // Per the business unit, we must specify permissions per folder.
        dSecurity.SetAccessRuleProtection(true, true);

        // Copy the permissions from TemplateSecurity to Destination folder.
        AuthorizationRuleCollection acl = TemplateSecurity.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(NTAccount));

        foreach (FileSystemAccessRule ace in acl)
        {
            // Set the existing security.
            dSecurity.AddAccessRule(ace);

            try
            {
                // Remove folder inheritance...
                dSecurity.AddAccessRule(new FileSystemAccessRule(
                    ace.IdentityReference, ace.FileSystemRights,
                    InheritanceFlags.ContainerInherit | InheritanceFlags.ObjectInherit,
                    PropagationFlags.None,
                    ace.AccessControlType));
            }
            catch { }
        }

        // Apply the new changes.
        Directory.SetAccessControl(destination, dSecurity);
    }

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay... I have a working prototype after A TON OF DIGGING on the internet. Needless to say, there's alot of mis-information about ACL online. I'm not exactly certain if this bit of info will be a godsend, or more mis-information. I'll have to leave that for you, the user, to decide.

What I ended up with is clean, slick, and very, very fast since it doesn't ever TOUCH the domain server. I'm copying the SDDL entries directly. Wait, you say... you can't do that on a directory because you get the dreaded SeSecurityPrivilege error!

Not if you restrict the copy to ONLY the Access Control Lists (ACL).

Here's the code:

    public static void UpdateSecurity(string destination, DirectorySecurity templateSecurity)
    {
        DirectorySecurity dSecurity = Directory.GetAccessControl(destination);

        string sddl = templateSecurity.GetSecurityDescriptorSddlForm(AccessControlSections.Access);
        try
        {
            // TOTALLY REPLACE The existing access rights with the new ones.
            dSecurity.SetSecurityDescriptorSddlForm(sddl, AccessControlSections.Access);

            // Disable inheritance for this directory.
            dSecurity.SetAccessRuleProtection(true, true);


            // Apply these changes.
            Directory.SetAccessControl(destination, dSecurity);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Note the error on the console... we can formally log it later.
            Console.WriteLine(pth1 + " : " + ex.Message);
        }


        // Do some other settings stuff here...

    }

Note the AccessControlSections.Access flags on the SDDL methods. That was the magic key to make it all work.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.