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just to clarify this is hw.

In a project we're doing, a user isn't allowed to enter numbers or special characters (i.e ! @ £ etc)

        char letter;
        String phonetic;

        Scanner kb = new Scanner(System.in);


        System.out.print("Please enter a letter: ");
        letter = letter = kb.next().charAt(0);

        switch(Character.toUpperCase(letter))
{
       case 'A':
            {
                Dot();
                Dash();
                Red();
            }
            break;

        case '1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0':
            {
               System.out.println('No number input please!');
            }
        break;
}

The error is on

'1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0' 

Eclipse says

invalid character constant 

Isn't it really long winded if I have to enter all the numbers manually?

i.e. case '1': case '2':

even with

case 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0: 

It won't work.

Is there an shorter way to do this using switch statements?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Using switch? No. But there is Character.isDigit() –  madth3 Jan 30 '13 at 18:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its because Case expression should be an int-compatible literal or a String from java 7.

case '1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0':

character literals are represented using single quotes. c, it should only be of one length, while your case doesn't reflect that, thus the error.

'1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0'  this is not a legal character.

If you just wanna check if the character is only alpha, then use Charcter#isDigit(char) or Charcter#isLetter before the switch starts like in below code:

char ch=  (Character.toUpperCase(letter);
if(!Character.isDigit(ch)) {
    switch(Character.toUpperCase(letter))
     {
       case 'A':
            {
                Dot();
                Dash();
                Red();
            }
            break;
        }
     }
else {
       System.out.println("no numbers please")
}
share|improve this answer
    
It worked! Without the else though. Thank you. –  Eggy Jan 30 '13 at 18:46
    
@Eggy you are welcome .. :) –  PermGenError Jan 30 '13 at 18:50

There's no easier way using case, what about?:

if ('0' <= letter && letter <= '9')
  System.out.println('No number input please!');
share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting a 'Unreachable code' error –  Eggy Jan 30 '13 at 18:34
    
It's usually because of a break or return somewhere there shouldn't be one. Note that you can't just replace the case inside the switch with an if, it'll need to be outside the switch or in the default. –  Dukeling Jan 30 '13 at 18:44

Isn't it really long winded if I have to enter all the numbers manually?

Yes.

Is there an shorter way to do this using switch statements?

No.

Consider an if statement instead...

share|improve this answer

No, Java in this situation is not smart like C#. You need to write multiple lines for that. If you want to compare strings you need to use if statements. Also remember to use this code for comparision:

if("search".equals(string2)) {...}

You cannot compare by == this would only compare the memory addresses. Also note that I use the equals on the static string and not on the variable string2 because you code would break if string2 is null.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm no upvotes. Did I wrote something wrong? –  rekire Jan 30 '13 at 18:32
    
I refrained from upvoting because I had a hard time understanding what you wrote because of poor language/grammar/spelling. Comparing java to c# is not really relevant. Also, I do not find your if statement and what follows that helpful. –  Colin D Jan 30 '13 at 18:37
    
@ColinD thank you for your feedback. I'm no native speaker so I have sometimes trouble to write perfect english. I'm compairing Java to C# because I use both languages and I hate the way how switch case works in Java. I love android programming so I use it daily. But I miss the properties from .net. –  rekire Jan 30 '13 at 18:41

I hope this one enlighten you more.

Consider, your expression generates output as A , B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, ...till Z. and you want to execute same method/function for all them.

Then, you can check the ascii values of the characters and modify your code to use if and for loop or else use switch as mentioned in the program in following example program.

Play around with code to learn more.

public class SwitchClass 
{   

public void method1()
{
        System.out.println("Menthod 1");
}

public void method2()
{
        System.out.println("Menthod 2");
}

public void method3()
{
        System.out.println("Menthod 3");
}   

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    SwitchClass sw = new SwitchClass();
    System.out.println("Enter the String:");
    String input = in.next();

    for(int i = 0; i<input.length(); i++)
    {

        switch(Character.toUpperCase(input.charAt(i)))
        {

            case 'A':
            case 'B':
            case 'C':
            case 'U':
                    System.out.println(Character.toUppercase(input.charAt(i))+" Case calling");
                    sw.method1();
                    sw.method2();
                    sw.method3();
                    break;

            default:
                    System.out.println("No number input please!");
                    break;
        }
    }       
}
}
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