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I have a question about how controllers and Form work in web2py. Consider next controller function (from we2py book):

def display_form():
form=FORM('Your name:',
          INPUT(_name='name', requires=IS_NOT_EMPTY()),
          INPUT(_type='submit'))
if form.accepts(request,session):
    response.flash = 'form accepted'
elif form.errors:
    response.flash = 'form has errors'
else:
    response.flash = 'please fill the form'
return dict(form=form)

This function two goals: first is to return a form and second is to tell what to do on submission button. I cannot understand how it is possible. Is it called two times? first time when view need to know what is form and second time when submit button is pressed? Intuitively this piece:

if form.accepts(request,session):
    response.flash = 'form accepted'
elif form.errors:
    response.flash = 'form has errors'
else:
    response.flash = 'please fill the form'

should be in some different function which is responsible for post processing.

How does it work?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, the function is called twice. When the URL for that function is called without posting any form values, the form.accepts() function fails (i.e., returns False) because no data have been submitted. In that case, all that is returned is a new blank form. When the user ultimately submits the form, the form values are posted to the same function. In that case, form.accepts() finds the posted form data in request.post_vars. It then validates the data, and if validation passes, it returns True and response.flash is set to 'form accepted'.

This is referred to as a postback or self-submission. For more, see here.

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thanks for the link –  msh Jan 30 '13 at 21:01

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