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I have a dataframe that contains timestamps (m/d/yyyy H:M). My ultimate goal is to summarize the data by using the timestamps (e.g. hourly, daily, subset of hours by day, etc).

When importing the data I am using read.csv. The first column is the timestamp. It is considered a factor when I use read.csv. Should I use a row.names parameter when I read it in, or should convert the factor to a timestamp?

If I should convert, my timestamp is currently ambiguous, I could convert to YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS before I read it in (in Excel?) and then use as.POSIXct to covert from factor. Or, I could leave it as-is and use strptime to convert from factor. Is one of these options better for my end goal?

I have run into problems trying to use code from sample data that will works on my own dataset. Due to this, I hope that this more basic question will lead to future success when the procedures become more complicated.

#dput of partial dataset
data <- structure(list(TIMESTAMP = structure(1:15, .Label = c("1/1/2012 11:00", 
"1/1/2012 12:00", "1/1/2012 13:00", "1/1/2012 14:00", "1/1/2012 15:00", 
"1/2/2012 11:00", "1/2/2012 12:00", "1/2/2012 13:00", "1/2/2012 14:00", 
"1/2/2012 15:00", "4/7/2012 11:00", "4/7/2012 12:00", "4/7/2012 13:00", 
"4/7/2012 14:00", "4/7/2012 15:00"), class = "factor"), P = c(992.4, 
992.4, 992.4, 992.4, 992.4, 992.4, 992.4, 992.4, 992.4, 992.4, 
239, 239, 239, 239, 239), WS = c(4.023, 3.576, 4.023, 6.259, 
4.47, 3.576, 3.576, 2.682, 4.023, 3.576, 2.682, 3.129, 2.682, 
2.235, 2.682), WD = c(212L, 200L, 215L, 213L, 204L, 304L, 276L, 
273L, 307L, 270L, 54L, 24L, 304L, 320L, 321L), AT = c(16.11, 
18.89, 20, 20, 19.44, 10.56, 11.11, 11.67, 12.22, 11.11, 17.22, 
18.33, 19.44, 20.56, 21.11), FT = c(17.22, 22.22, 22.78, 22.78, 
20, 11.11, 15.56, 17.22, 17.78, 15.56, 24.44, 25.56, 29.44, 30.56, 
29.44), H = c(50L, 38L, 38L, 39L, 48L, 24L, 19L, 18L, 16L, 18L, 
23L, 20L, 18L, 17L, 15L), B = c(1029L, 1027L, 1026L, 1024L, 1023L, 
1026L, 1025L, 1024L, 1023L, 1023L, 1034L, 1033L, 1032L, 1031L, 
1030L), FM = c(14.9, 14.4, 14, 13.7, 13.6, 13.1, 12.8, 12.3, 
12, 11.7, 12.8, 12, 11.4, 10.9, 10.4), GD = c(204L, 220L, 227L, 
222L, 216L, 338L, 311L, 326L, 310L, 273L, 62L, 13L, 312L, 272L, 
281L), MG = c(8.047, 9.835, 10.28, 13.41, 11.18, 9.388, 8.941, 
8.494, 9.835, 10.73, 6.706, 7.153, 8.047, 8.047, 7.6), SR = c(522L, 
603L, 604L, 526L, 248L, 569L, 653L, 671L, 616L, 487L, 972L, 1053L, 
1061L, 1002L, 865L), WS2 = c(2.235, 3.576, 4.47, 4.47, 5.364, 
4.023, 2.682, 3.576, 3.576, 4.023, 3.129, 3.129, 3.576, 2.682, 
3.129), WD2 = c(200L, 201L, 206L, 210L, 211L, 319L, 315L, 311L, 
302L, 290L, 49L, 39L, 15L, 348L, 329L)), .Names = c("TIMESTAMP", 
"P", "WS", "WD", "AT", "FT", "H", "B", "FM", "GD", "MG", "SR", 
"WS2", "WD2"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -15L))
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to answer one of your question, to not load as factor use read.csv(fn, stringsAsFactors = FALSE). But if you want other columns to remain factors, then load it without this parameter and then just do as.character(.) on this column alone. –  Arun Jan 30 '13 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given you data, you could use

data$TIMESTAMP <- as.POSIXct(as.character(data$TIMESTAMP), format = '%m/%d/%Y %H:%M')

to convert your timestamp to POSIXct class. Or use stringsAsFactors = FALSE as Arun suggested, in which case you don't need as.character above.

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