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I'm looking here at a summary of "interfaces" in Java: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/summary-interface.html

The first line states, "An interface defines a protocol of communication between two objects."

Is that really accurate? From my understanding, an interface is just a contract promising to offer some set of members/methods, which could be used by any arbitrary number of clients (so long as they have proper access per the access modifiers). Am I missing some "other side" of the contract which would make an interface "between two objects"?


EDIT: From the answers/comments (and the votes to close! :-[ ), I think I have it figured out. I think I was just getting hooked on the "between two objects" and assuming it meant "between ONLY two objects", which was apparently a wrong assumption. Thanks!

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closed as not constructive by millimoose, Thomas Jungblut, Falmarri, jlordo, Andrew Barber Jan 30 '13 at 20:29

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I'm not sure whether this level of semantics-lawyering makes for a good SO question. –  millimoose Jan 30 '13 at 19:56
    
You could have any number of clients but only one at a time. –  madth3 Jan 30 '13 at 19:58
    
It might seem not constructive or even argumentative, but I see nothing wrong with presenting multiple (objective) viewpoints on an important programming term. Everyone learns things differently and sometimes a paradigm shift is needed to understand a particular statement, and I see nothing wrong with providing that shift as an objective answer on Stack Overflow. (+1 to offset downvoting) –  Platinum Azure Jan 30 '13 at 19:59
    
@millimoose : Yikes, I wasn't going for "semantics-lawyering", I was just trying to see if I had misunderstood something. If I'm plain wrong, just say so and my question is answered. :-| –  loneboat Jan 30 '13 at 20:01
    
@PlatinumAzure: There might be nothing wrong about that, but that doesn't it make an appropriate SO question. –  millimoose Jan 30 '13 at 20:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Whenever you use an object you use it always from another object. You don't call a method from more than an object at the same time.

So if A offers an interface, then B relies on it and C too but A is still offering an interface to B and C separately.

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I think this answers it for me. I think I was just getting hooked on the "between two objects" and assuming "between ONLY two objects", which was apparently a wrong assumption. Thanks! –  loneboat Jan 30 '13 at 20:07

From my understanding, an interface is just a contract promising to offer some set of members/methods

That's pretty close to the definition of a protocol.

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Thanks for the reply. My issue wasn't the definition of a protocol, but the claim that it was "between two objects". Can't an Interface be used by any number of clients? I took "between two objects" to mean there were somehow two "sides" of an Interface. :-\ –  loneboat Jan 30 '13 at 19:59

I wouldn't call it inaccurate. If anything, it's just an oversimplification.

You're right that any number of clients can use the object implementing an interface. And for that matter, you would be right to say that the client doesn't have to be an object (it could be a static method in a class, meaning it's hard to say that the client is an object). But the point about defining a protocol for communication is not wrong, even if requires thinking through a different paradigm.

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The method signatures defined in the Interface are the enforcement. You have the implementer of the interface on one side, and the client on the other who calls the implementer.

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