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Been trying to implement Rabin-Miller Strong Pseudoprime Test today.

Have used Wolfram Mathworld as reference, lines 3-5 sums up my code pretty much.

However, when I run the program, it says (sometimes) that primes (even low such as 5, 7, 11) are not primes. I've looked over the code for a very long while and cannot figure out what is wrong.

For help I've looked at this site aswell as many other sites but most use another definition (probably the same, but since I'm new to this kind of math, I can't see the same obvious connection).

My Code:

import random

def RabinMiller(n, k):

    # obviously not prime
    if n < 2 or n % 2 == 0:
        return False

    # special case        
    if n == 2:
        return True

    s = 0
    r = n - 1

    # factor n - 1 as 2^(r)*s
    while r % 2 == 0:
        s = s + 1
        r = r // 2  # floor

    # k = accuracy
    for i in range(k):
        a = random.randrange(1, n)

        # a^(s) mod n = 1?
        if pow(a, s, n) == 1:
            return True

        # a^(2^(j) * s) mod n = -1 mod n?
        for j in range(r):
            if pow(a, 2**j*s, n) == -1 % n:
                return True

    return False

print(RabinMiller(7, 5))

How does this differ from the definition given at Mathworld?

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Why does this have Java as a tag? Looks like Python to me... –  Peter Jan 30 '13 at 20:41
    
If you are using Java, maybe you could show us your java code to compare to the algorithm. –  Lee Meador Jan 30 '13 at 20:42
    
Sorry, originally wrote it in Java and then rewrote in Python to make it easier to read. Then when I posted I wasn't allowed to create new tags (not saying Python is a new tag) and just took Java because I'm all up in it. Once again, sorry for this. –  Maxwell Jan 30 '13 at 20:47
2  
You should put if n == 2 before the check for even numbers, because otherwise you'll return False before you even check if the number is 2. –  voithos Jan 30 '13 at 20:51
2  
FWIW a lot of the logic is flipped here. The idea behind Rabin-Miller is that you test a bunch of things, and if the number is prime they will pass, so if they don't pass, then it's composite. Right now you're returning True as soon as any test happens to pass. Instead, you really want to test those conditions, and if they fail then you should return False, and at the end return True (meaning possibly-prime). –  DSM Jan 30 '13 at 21:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1. Comments on your code

A number of the points I'll make below were noted in other answers, but it seems useful to have them all together.

  1. In the section

    s = 0
    r = n - 1
    
    # factor n - 1 as 2^(r)*s
    while r % 2 == 0:
        s = s + 1
        r = r // 2  # floor
    

    you've got the roles of r and s swapped: you've actually factored n − 1 as 2sr. If you want to stick to the MathWorld notation, then you'll have to swap r and s in this section of the code:

    # factor n - 1 as 2^(r)*s, where s is odd.
    r, s = 0, n - 1
    while s % 2 == 0:
        r += 1
        s //= 2
    
  2. In the line

    for i in range(k):
    

    the variable i is unused: it's conventional to name such variables _.

  3. You pick a random base between 1 and n − 1 inclusive:

    a = random.randrange(1, n)
    

    This is what it says in the MathWorld article, but that article is written from the mathematician's point of view. In fact it is useless to pick the base 1, since 1s = 1 (mod n) and you'll waste a trial. Similarly, it's useless to pick the base n − 1, since s is odd and so (n − 1)s = −1 (mod n). Mathematicians don't have to worry about wasted trials, but programmers do, so write instead:

    a = random.randrange(2, n - 1)
    

    (n needs to be at least 4 for this optimization to work, but we can easily arrange that by returning True at the top of the function when n = 3, just as you do for n = 2.)

  4. As noted in other replies, you've misunderstood the MathWorld article. When it says that "n passes the test" it means that "n passes the test for the base a". The distinguishing fact about primes is that they pass the test for all bases. So when you find that as = 1 (mod n), what you should do is to go round the loop and pick the next base to test against.

    # a^(s) = 1 (mod n)?
    x = pow(a, s, n)
    if x == 1:
        continue
    
  5. There's an opportunity for optimization here. The value x that we've just computed is a20 s (mod n). So we could test it immediately and save ourselves one loop iteration:

    # a^(s) = ±1 (mod n)?
    x = pow(a, s, n)
    if x == 1 or x == n - 1:
        continue
    
  6. In the section where you calculate a2j s (mod n) each of these numbers is the square of the previous number (modulo n). It's wasteful to calculate each from scratch when you could just square the previous value. So you should write this loop as:

    # a^(2^(j) * s) = -1 (mod n)?
    for _ in range(r - 1):
        x = pow(x, 2, n)
        if x == n - 1:
            break
    else:
        return False
    
  7. It's a good idea to test for divisibility by small primes before trying Miller–Rabin. For example, in Rabin's 1977 paper he says:

    In implementing the algorithm we incorporate some laborsaving steps. First we test for divisibility by any prime p < N, where, say N = 1000.

2. Revised code

Putting all this together:

from random import randrange

small_primes = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31] # etc.

def probably_prime(n, k):
    """Return True if n passes k rounds of the Miller-Rabin primality
    test (and is probably prime). Return False if n is proved to be
    composite.

    """
    if n < 2: return False
    for p in small_primes:
        if n < p * p: return True
        if n % p == 0: return False
    r, s = 0, n - 1
    while s % 2 == 0:
        r += 1
        s //= 2
    for _ in range(k):
        a = randrange(2, n - 1)
        x = pow(a, s, n)
        if x == 1 or x == n - 1:
            continue
        for _ in range(r - 1):
            x = pow(x, 2, n)
            if x == n - 1:
                break
        else:
            return False
    return True
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In addition to what Omri Barel has said, there is also a problem with your for loop. You will return true if you find one a that passes the test. However, all a have to pass the test for n to be a probable prime.

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According to Mathworld ... or a^(2^(j)*s) = -1 {mod n) for some 0 <= j <= r - 1 ... I interpret this as it just requires one match for n to pass the test. –  Maxwell Jan 30 '13 at 21:39
1  
@Maxwell: you are clearly misreading Mathworld's decription of the test. For a single given a, your candidate passes the test. Now keep reading. It says "a prime will pass the test for all possible choices of a". It then describes why if your candidate passes k such tests you can get the (1/4)**k bound. It has to pass all k tests. All of them, not just one. –  GregS Jan 31 '13 at 0:14

I'm wondering about this piece of code:

# factor n - 1 as 2^(r)*s
while r % 2 == 0:
    s = s + 1
    r = r // 2  # floor

Let's take n = 7. So n - 1 = 6. We can express n - 1 as 2^1 * 3. In this case r = 1 and s = 3.

But the code above finds something else. It starts with r = 6, so r % 2 == 0. Initially, s = 0 so after one iteration we have s = 1 and r = 3. But now r % 2 != 0 and the loop terminates.

We end up with s = 1 and r = 3 which is clearly incorrect: 2^r * s = 8.

You should not update s in the loop. Instead, you should count how many times you can divide by 2 (this will be r) and the result after the divisions will be s. In the example of n = 7, n - 1 = 6, we can divide it once (so r = 1) and after the division we end up with 3 (so s = 3).

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Thank you - this is the solution to my problem! –  Maxwell Jan 30 '13 at 21:37
    
There is still a problem with the code though (unless I am being totally obtuse - quite possible, it's late). s=3, r=1, a=4, j=0 then pow(a,2**j*s,n) = 1 and (-1 % n) = 6, so n=7 not prime??? –  isedev Jan 30 '13 at 21:44
    
Yes, however the condition just above says if pow(a, s, n) == 1. This gives us 4^3 = 64 = 1 mod 7. Which is equal to 1. –  Maxwell Jan 30 '13 at 21:53
    
got you, 'or' not 'and'... I was being obtuse :( –  isedev Jan 30 '13 at 22:03

You should also have a look at Wikipedia, where known "random" sequences gives guaranteed answers up to a given prime.

  • if n < 1,373,653, it is enough to test a = 2 and 3;
  • if n < 9,080,191, it is enough to test a = 31 and 73;
  • if n < 4,759,123,141, it is enough to test a = 2, 7, and 61;
  • if n < 2,152,302,898,747, it is enough to test a = 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11;
  • if n < 3,474,749,660,383, it is enough to test a = 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, and 13;
  • if n < 341,550,071,728,321, it is enough to test a = 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, and 17;
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1  
You can find even better bases from numbers up to 2^64 on miller-rabin.appspot.com –  Albin Sunnanbo Feb 11 '13 at 11:59

Here's my version:

# miller-rabin pseudoprimality checker

from random import randrange

def isStrongPseudoprime(n, a):
    d, s = n-1, 0
    while d % 2 == 0:
        d, s = d/2, s+1
    t = pow(a, d, n)
    if t == 1:
        return True
    while s > 0:
        if t == n - 1:
            return True
        t, s = pow(t, 2, n), s - 1
    return False

def isPrime(n, k):
    if n % 2 == 0:
        return n == 2
    for i in range(1, k):
        a = randrange(2, n)
        if not isStrongPseudoprime(n, a):
            return False
    return True

If you want to know more about programming with prime numbers, I modestly recommend this essay on my blog.

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