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I need a robust and simple way to remove illegal path and file characters from a simple string. I've used the below code but it doesn't seem to do anything, what am I missing?

using System;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string illegal = "\"M<>\"\\a/ry/ h**ad:>> a\\/:*?\"<>| li*tt|le|| la\"mb.?";

            illegal = illegal.Trim(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars());
            illegal = illegal.Trim(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());

            Console.WriteLine(illegal);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Trim removes characters from the beginning and end of strings. However, you probably should ask why the data is invalid, and rather than try and sanitize/fix the data, reject the data. –  user7116 Sep 28 '08 at 15:54
3  
Unix style names are not valid on Windows and i don't want to deal with 8.3 shortnames. –  Gary Willoughby Oct 16 '09 at 12:04

18 Answers 18

up vote 206 down vote accepted

Try something like this instead;

string illegal = "\"M\"\\a/ry/ h**ad:>> a\\/:*?\"| li*tt|le|| la\"mb.?";
string invalid = new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) + new string(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());

foreach (char c in invalid)
{
    illegal = illegal.Replace(c.ToString(), ""); 
}

But I have to agree with the comments, I'd probably try to deal with the source of the illegal paths, rather than try to mangle an illegal path into a legitimate but probably unintended one.

Edit: Or a potentially 'better' solution, using Regex's.

string illegal = "\"M\"\\a/ry/ h**ad:>> a\\/:*?\"| li*tt|le|| la\"mb.?";
string regexSearch = new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) + new string(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());
Regex r = new Regex(string.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(regexSearch)));
illegal = r.Replace(illegal, "");

Still, the question begs to be asked, why you're doing this in the first place.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't know if I should +1 your answer for having such an ill-performing solution that will push the user away from that path, or if I should +1 your answer for it actually answering his question! :) –  user7116 Sep 28 '08 at 16:05
4  
It's not necessary to append the two lists together. The illegal file name char list contains the illegal path char list and has a few more. Here are lists of both lists cast to int: 34,60,62,124,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25‌​,26,27,28,29,30,31,58,42,63,92,47 34,60,62,124,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25‌​,26,27,28,29,30,31 –  Sarel Botha Apr 11 '11 at 18:12
3  
@sjbotha this may be true on Windows and Microsoft's implementation of .NET I'm not willing to make the same assumption for say mono running Linux. –  Matthew Scharley Apr 17 '11 at 1:24
5  
Regarding the first solution. Shouldn't a StringBuilder be more efficient than the string assignments? –  epignosisx Dec 30 '11 at 15:53
2  
@JoeyAdams: see my reply to Sarel Botha. In short, one is a superset of the other on Windows. Personally, I'm not willing to make the same bet cross platform and C# and .NET in general is getting a wider and wider audience via Mono all the time. –  Matthew Scharley Nov 15 '13 at 8:18

I use Linq to clean up filenames. You can easily extend this to check for valid paths as well.

private static string CleanFileName(string fileName)
{
    return Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars().Aggregate(fileName, (current, c) => current.Replace(c.ToString(), string.Empty));
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you want to CLEAN the characters, you want to replace with "". You're currently substituting bad characters with a SPACE. –  Eric J. Mar 25 '12 at 21:46
1  
Good catch. In the particular case for which I wrote this method spaces made sense. But I agree in general it's probably more useful to remove the invalid character w/o inserting a space. –  Michael Minton Mar 28 '12 at 18:55
1  
This did not work for me. The method is not returning the clean string. It is returning the passed filename as it is. –  Karan Jul 17 '13 at 6:29
    
What @Karan said, this does not work, the original string comes back. –  Jon Mar 20 at 15:26

You can remove illegal chars using Linq like this:

var invalidChars = Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars();

var invalidCharsRemoved = stringWithInvalidChars
.Where(x => !invalidChars.Contains(x))
.ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
I like this way : you keep only the allowed chars in the string (which is nothing else than a char array). –  Dude Pascalou Jul 4 '12 at 9:36

For starters, Trim only removes characters from the beginning or end of the string. Secondly, you should evaluate if you really want to remove the offensive characters, or fail fast and let the user know their filename is invalid. My choice is the latter, but my answer should at least show you how to do things the right AND wrong way:

StackOverflow question showing how to check if a given string is a valid file name. Note you can use the regex from this question to remove characters with a regular expression replacement (if you really need to do this).

share|improve this answer
    
I especially agree with the second advice. –  OregonGhost Sep 28 '08 at 15:59
1  
I would normally agree with the second, but I have a program which generates a filename and which may contain illegal characters in some situations. Since my program is generating the illegal filenames, I think it's appropriate to remove/replace those characters. (Just pointing out a valid use-case) –  JDB May 9 '13 at 15:48

These are all great solutions, but they all rely on Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars, which may not be as reliable as you'd think. Notice the following remark in the MSDN documentation on Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars:

The array returned from this method is not guaranteed to contain the complete set of characters that are invalid in file and directory names. The full set of invalid characters can vary by file system. For example, on Windows-based desktop platforms, invalid path characters might include ASCII/Unicode characters 1 through 31, as well as quote ("), less than (<), greater than (>), pipe (|), backspace (\b), null (\0) and tab (\t).

It's not any better with Path.GetInvalidPathChars method. It contains the exact same remark.

share|improve this answer
3  
Then what is the point of Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars? I would expect it to return exactly the invalid characters for the current system, relying on .NET to know which filesystem I'm running on and presenting me the fitting invalid chars. If this is not the case and it just returns hardcoded characters, which are not reliable in the first place, this method should be removed since it has zero value. –  Jan Jan 18 at 18:08

I use regular expressions to achieve this. First, I dynamically build the regex.

string regex = string.Format(
                   "[{0}]",
                   Regex.Escape(new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())));
Regex removeInvalidChars = new Regex(regex, RegexOptions.Singleline | RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant);

Then I just call removeInvalidChars.Replace to do the find and replace. This can obviously be extended to cover path chars as well.

share|improve this answer
    
That code doesn't work for some reason. –  Lone Coder Feb 6 '10 at 21:52
    
Strange, it has been working for me. I'll double-check it when I get chance. Can you be more specific and explain what exactly isn't working for you? –  Jeff Yates Feb 8 '10 at 15:56
1  
It won't work (properly at the very least) because you aren't escaping the path characters properly, and some of them have a special meaning. Refer to my answer for how to do that. –  Matthew Scharley Apr 8 '10 at 21:39
    
@Matthew: Good point. I didn't think of that. –  Jeff Yates Apr 9 '10 at 13:14
    
@Jeff: Your version is still better than Matthew's, if you slightly modify it. Refer to my answer on how. –  Jan Feb 13 '12 at 8:28

I absolutely prefer the idea of Jeff Yates. It will work perfectly, if you slightly modify it:

string regex = String.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())));
Regex removeInvalidChars = new Regex(regex, RegexOptions.Singleline | RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant);

The improvement is just to escape the automaticially generated regex.

share|improve this answer

Here's a code snippet that should help for .NET 3 and higher.

using System.IO;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public static class PathValidation
{
    private static string pathValidatorExpression = "^[^" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidPathChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]+$";
    private static Regex pathValidator = new Regex(pathValidatorExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    private static string fileNameValidatorExpression = "^[^" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]+$";
    private static Regex fileNameValidator = new Regex(fileNameValidatorExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    private static string pathCleanerExpression = "[" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidPathChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]";
    private static Regex pathCleaner = new Regex(pathCleanerExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    private static string fileNameCleanerExpression = "[" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]";
    private static Regex fileNameCleaner = new Regex(fileNameCleanerExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    public static bool ValidatePath(string path)
    {
        return pathValidator.IsMatch(path);
    }

    public static bool ValidateFileName(string fileName)
    {
        return fileNameValidator.IsMatch(fileName);
    }

    public static string CleanPath(string path)
    {
        return pathCleaner.Replace(path, "");
    }

    public static string CleanFileName(string fileName)
    {
        return fileNameCleaner.Replace(fileName, "");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Most solutions above combine illegal chars for both path and filename which is wrong (even when both calls currently return the same set of chars). I would first split the path+filename in path and filename, then apply the appropriate set to either if them and then combine the two again.

wvd_vegt

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Very true. Today, working in .NET 4.0, the regex solution from the top answer nuked all backslashes in a full path. So I made a regex for the dir path and a regex for just the filename, cleaned separately and recombined –  dario_ramos May 22 '13 at 21:03

Throw an exception.

if ( fileName.IndexOfAny(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) > -1 )
            {
                throw new ArgumentException();
            }
share|improve this answer

For file names:

string cleanFileName = String.Join("", fileName.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()));

For full paths:

string cleanPath = String.Join("", path.Split(Path.GetInvalidPathChars()));
share|improve this answer
public string GetSafeFilename(string filename)
{

    return string.Join("_", filename.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()));

}

This answer was on another thread by Ceres, I really like it neat and simple.

share|improve this answer

I think it is much easier to validate using a regex and specifiing which characters are allowed, instead of trying to check for all bad characters. See these links: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/prasad_1/RegExpPSD12062005021717AM/RegExpPSD.aspx http://www.windowsdevcenter.com/pub/a/oreilly/windows/news/csharp_0101.html

Also, do a search for "regular expression editor"s, they help a lot. There are some around which even output the code in c# for you.

share|improve this answer

String.Trim() only removes chars from the beginning and end of the string.

share|improve this answer

I wrote this monster for fun, it lets you roundtrip:

public static class FileUtility
{
    private const char PrefixChar = '%';
    private static readonly int MaxLength;
    private static readonly Dictionary<char,char[]> Illegals;
    static FileUtility()
    {
        List<char> illegal = new List<char> { PrefixChar };
        illegal.AddRange(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars());
        MaxLength = illegal.Select(x => ((int)x).ToString().Length).Max();
        Illegals = illegal.ToDictionary(x => x, x => ((int)x).ToString("D" + MaxLength).ToCharArray());
    }

    public static string FilenameEncode(string s)
    {
        var builder = new StringBuilder();
        char[] replacement;
        using (var reader = new StringReader(s))
        {
            while (true)
            {
                int read = reader.Read();
                if (read == -1)
                    break;
                char c = (char)read;
                if(Illegals.TryGetValue(c,out replacement))
                {
                    builder.Append(PrefixChar);
                    builder.Append(replacement);
                }
                else
                {
                    builder.Append(c);
                }
            }
        }
        return builder.ToString();
    }

    public static string FilenameDecode(string s)
    {
        var builder = new StringBuilder();
        char[] buffer = new char[MaxLength];
        using (var reader = new StringReader(s))
        {
            while (true)
            {
                int read = reader.Read();
                if (read == -1)
                    break;
                char c = (char)read;
                if (c == PrefixChar)
                {
                    reader.Read(buffer, 0, MaxLength);
                    var encoded =(char) ParseCharArray(buffer);
                    builder.Append(encoded);
                }
                else
                {
                    builder.Append(c);
                }
            }
        }
        return builder.ToString();
    }

    public static int ParseCharArray(char[] buffer)
    {
        int result = 0;
        foreach (char t in buffer)
        {
            int digit = t - '0';
            if ((digit < 0) || (digit > 9))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Input string was not in the correct format");
            }
            result *= 10;
            result += digit;
        }
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this because it avoids having two different strings creating the same resulting path. –  Kim Jan 29 at 16:25

The best way to remove illegal character from user input is to replace illegal character using Regex class ,create method in code behind or also it validate at client side using RegularExpression control.

public string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str)
        {

            return Regex.Replace(str, "[^a-zA-Z0-9_]+", "_", RegexOptions.Compiled);
        }

OR

     &lt;asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="regxFolderName" 
     runat="server" ErrorMessage="Enter folder name with  a-z A-Z0-9_" ControlToValidate="txtFolderName" 
Display="Dynamic" ValidationExpression="^[a-zA-Z0-9_]*$" ForeColor="Red"/&gt;
share|improve this answer
public static bool IsValidFilename(string testName)
{
    return !new Regex("[" + Regex.Escape(new String(System.IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())) + "]").IsMatch(testName);
}
share|improve this answer

Or you can just do

[YOUR STRING].Replace('\\', ' ').Replace('/', ' ').Replace('"', ' ').Replace('*', ' ').Replace(':', ' ').Replace('?', ' ').Replace('<', ' ').Replace('>', ' ').Replace('|', ' ').Trim();
share|improve this answer

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