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Using spherical coordinates, I am drawing an arc around the surface of a sphere. Here is my code:

    int goose1a_egg1_step = 0; // THIS IS INCREMENTED EACH FRAME
    float goose1a_egg1_theta=7.5; // START THETA
    float goose1a_egg1_phi=4; // START PHI
    float goose1a_egg1_theta_increment = 1.5/goose1a_egg1_divider; // END THETA = 6
    float goose1a_egg1_phi_increment = 3/goose1a_egg1_divider; // END PHI = 1

    float goose1a_egg1_theta_math1 = (goose1a_egg1_theta-(goose1a_egg1_theta_increment* r_goose1a_egg1_step))/10.0*M_PI;
    float goose1a_egg1_phi_math1 = (goose1a_egg1_phi-(goose1a_egg1_phi_increment* r_goose1a_egg1_step))/10.0*2*M_PI;
    r_goose1a_egg1_x = radius_egg_pos * sin(goose1a_egg1_theta_math1) * cos(goose1a_egg1_phi_math1);
    r_goose1a_egg1_y = radius_egg_pos * sin(goose1a_egg1_theta_math1) * sin(goose1a_egg1_phi_math1);
    r_goose1a_egg1_z = radius_egg_pos * cos(goose1a_egg1_theta_math1);  

    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(r_goose1a_egg1_x,r_goose1a_egg1_y,r_goose1a_egg1_z);
    glColor3f (1, 1, .8);
    glutSolidSphere (0.02,5,5);
    glEnd();
    glPopMatrix();

I would like to draw an additional arc, that has the same START and END positions. The catch is, rather than having the second arc follow the exact same trajectory as the first, can I tune my math so that there is variability in the arc? For instance, the second arc would travel a slightly divergent path from the first. Like two flights leaving DFW for JFK, but taking slightly different routes.

The code for the second arc is as follows (note: the only difference between the two is "goose1a" and "goose1b" - I don't want to add a bunch of cruft here in which I was randomly multiplying random variables by random integers :/ )

    int goose1b_egg1_step = 0; // THIS IS INCREMENTED EACH FRAME
    float goose1b_egg1_theta=7.5; // START THETA
    float goose1b_egg1_phi=4; // START PHI
    float goose1b_egg1_theta_increment = 1.5/goose1b_egg1_divider; // END THETA = 6
    float goose1b_egg1_phi_increment = 3/goose1b_egg1_divider; // END PHI = 1

    float goose1b_egg1_theta_math1 = (goose1b_egg1_theta-(goose1b_egg1_theta_increment* r_goose1b_egg1_step))/10.0*M_PI;
    float goose1b_egg1_phi_math1 = (goose1b_egg1_phi-(goose1b_egg1_phi_increment* r_goose1b_egg1_step))/10.0*2*M_PI;
    r_goose1b_egg1_x = radius_egg_pos * sin(goose1b_egg1_theta_math1) * cos(goose1b_egg1_phi_math1);
    r_goose1b_egg1_y = radius_egg_pos * sin(goose1b_egg1_theta_math1) * sin(goose1b_egg1_phi_math1);
    r_goose1b_egg1_z = radius_egg_pos * cos(goose1b_egg1_theta_math1);  

    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(r_goose1b_egg1_x,r_goose1b_egg1_y,r_goose1b_egg1_z);
    glColor3f (1, 1, .8);
    glutSolidSphere (0.02,5,5);
    glEnd();
    glPopMatrix();

Because my understanding of 3D math is so poor, I'm not even sure if there's a way to do this? And if not, I'll look for an alternative solution to my design. But if it is possible to draw two different arcs that employ the same START and END positions using spherical coordinates, your advice and guidance will be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could try computing a B-spline in spherical co-ordinates. You would position two knots at each end-point and have one knot in the middle that you could push around (perpendicular to the shortest arc) to adjust the variability.

I believe you are computing the shortest arc from A to B, and unless the points are exactly opposite, there is only one shortest arc. So you need a curve in spherical space instead of a line.


Taking a different approach, note that a direct path joining two points on the surface of a sphere is the intersection between a sphere and a plane passing through those two points. If you can rotate that plane around the axis formed between those two points, the intersection will give you alternative arcs.

The trick is to calculate them. Read up on plane-sphere intersection. The formula ought to be an elliptical section so it might not be too bad. Then you don't need spherical co-ordinates.

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Thank you for your response paddy. What you say makes sense to me, in that I need an additional knot to add variation to it, and B-splines can certainly provide that. Computing a B-spline in spherical co-ordinates is something I will have to look further into however - that conversion is a very foreign concept to me. So if it is indeed not possible to tune what I'm already drawing, I'll get cracking on B-splines. Thank you again. –  kropcke Jan 30 '13 at 22:33
    
Spherical co-ordinates are just a mapping. Try treating it like any other 2D value. If you get stuck at the poles, maybe try quaternions. –  paddy Jan 30 '13 at 22:36
    
Thank you again paddy - I appreciate the simplification. I'll look into employing control points in spherical co-ordinates. –  kropcke Jan 30 '13 at 23:12
    
No worries. Another thought to consider is that an arc through two points on a sphere is the intersection between a sphere and a plane passing through those two points. If you can rotate that plane around the axis formed between those two points, the intersection will give you alternative arcs. The trick is to calculate them. Read up on plane-sphere intersection. The formula ought to be an elliptical section so it might not be too bad. Then you don't need spherical co-ordinates. –  paddy Jan 30 '13 at 23:15
    
Terrific - that is very easy to visualize. Thank you very much for the starting point. I think I can begin with the plane passing through the center of the sphere (that creates great circle arcs - or something like that). And then can move it off center as you say, and just calculate the new axis to rotate on. Your time is much appreciated - thank you again. –  kropcke Jan 30 '13 at 23:43

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