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HTML
I am adding my two links which will send my 'Unanswered' link to my admin controller and my 'Answered' link to a function in my admin controller.

<h2 class="unanswered">
   <?=anchor('admin/', 'Unanswered', array('class' => 'selected'))?>
</h2>

<h2 class="answered">
   <?=anchor('admin/answered_posts', 'Answered')?>
</h2>

Jquery
Here I am just trying to add and remove styles to my links. When I keep the return false my styles work fine, but my href in the html anchor no longer runs, so I am not able to get back the posts needed from my controller. When I remove the return false my href works fine and I am getting back what I need from my controller, but my styles that I am adding in my jQuery no longer work.

$('.unanswered').click(function(){
       $('.answered a').removeClass('active');
       $('.unanswered a').addClass('active'); 
       return false;
     });

     $('.answered').click(function(){
       $('.unanswered a').removeClass('active');
       $('.answered a').addClass('active');
       return false;
     });

Side Note
I have also tried doing:

$('.unanswered').click(function(e){
       e.preventDefault();
       $('.answered a').removeClass('active');
       $('.unanswered a').addClass('active'); 
     });

     $('.answered').click(function(e){
       e.preventDefault();
       $('.unanswered a').removeClass('active');
       $('.answered a').addClass('active');
     });
share|improve this question
    
with this setup, you will ALWAYS prevent default. you will never actually submit anything. –  PlantTheIdea Jan 30 '13 at 21:16
    
Returning false from the event handler means "don't do default action" - given that, the behavior makes sense. –  user166390 Jan 30 '13 at 21:16
2  
You can't have both. Either change the class on click and don't follow the href, or follow the href and not change the class. (the class actually does change, you just end up changing page too fast to see the difference.) If you performed ajax to get the content rather than changing the page, your class change would make more sense. –  Kevin B Jan 30 '13 at 21:22
    
Is the goal to have one link at a time with the "active" class? Depending on which one is clicked? –  Kris Hollenbeck Jan 30 '13 at 21:35
3  
You need to return the posts and update the page via AJAX for this to do what you want. The answers that you can't have both is just plain wrong, you can, you just can't change the page and have both without setting the class on page load depending on what's loading. –  Rick Calder Jan 30 '13 at 21:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd refer to the comments on the question - if I understand your intent (click a link, update something behind the scenes on the server, and apply a style on the page without reloading the page) this is probably something you'd want to do with AJAX. For example (untested code):

$('.unanswered, .answered').click(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: $(this).attr('href')
    }).done(function() {
        /* You'll need to add some logic in here to remove the active class from
        the answered or unanswered question if it exists. Depending on the rest of your 
        HTML, this could be done with something like $(this).closest('myWrapper').find('a.active').removeClass('active') */

        /* Once you've cleaned up any active classes, add an active class to this element */
        $(this).addClass('active');

    });
});

More reading on jQuery AJAX here: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

Since I don't understand exactly what you're attempting to do, you can also try this (which will update the class, then submit the request). You may not see the CSS changes reflected since the page will reload quickly.

$('.answered').click(function() {
   // Set up the classes here
   $('.unanswered a').removeClass('active');
   $(this).addClass('active');

   /* When this element has an active class, then it will redirect to the link's URL, the HREF attribute. We do this check because javascript is asynchronous, all lines can run at the same time, so this prevents window.location from being called before the class is changed */
   if($(this).hasClass('active')) {
       window.location = $(this).attr('href');
   }

   // Still return false to prevent the default redirect that would happen without javascript.
   return false;
 });
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