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I currently have a derived class and a base class. How can I make the base class of the derived class equal to a base class that I have? Will a shallow copy work?

class Base
{
    private string name; 
    public string Name { get; set; }
    private string address; 
    public string Address { get; set; }
}

class Derived:Base
{
    private string field; 
    public String field { get; set; }
}

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Base b = new Base();
            b.Address = "Iliff";
            b.Name = "somename"; 

            Derived d = new Derived();
            //How can I make the base class of d equal to b ?

        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Do you want to reference the same object, or copy? – andrew Jan 30 '13 at 21:16
    
It could reference the same object – Casper_2211 Jan 30 '13 at 21:18
    
why do you need a 'b' and a 'd'? what's the purpose of either one of them? I am trying to make sense out of your code but I find myself a bit puzzled. why don't you just instantiate 'd' and store it as 'b' if you want to talk to base type? – bas Jan 30 '13 at 21:21
1  
I suggest you declare d and then set b from d via casting – andrew Jan 30 '13 at 21:35
    
Wonderful idea to use int as Name. – Ken Kin Jan 30 '13 at 23:35

If I understand you correctly, this will work:

class Derived : Base
{
    // all the code you had above, plus this:

    public Derived(Base toCopy)
    {
        this.name = toCopy.name;
        this.address = toCopy.address;
    }
}

Derived d = new Derived(b);
share|improve this answer

You will have to manually copy the fields of the Base instance to the new Derived instance.

A common way of doing this is by offering a copy constructor:

public Derived(Base other)
{
    if (other == null) {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("other");
    }

    this.name = other.name;
    this.address = other.address;
}

One more note about your code:

private string field; 
public string Field { get; set; }

This does not make much sense (same for the other properties).

public string Field { get; set; } means that a private field will automatically be created by the compiler. Your field field will never be used at all.

Either just write public string Field { get; set; }, as the private field will be created automatically. Or declare the Field property in a way so that your private field will be used:

private string field;

public string Field {
    get {
        return field;
    }
    set {
        field = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Create a copy constructor for the base class, in doing so you'll also need to create a parameterless one as well as by adding the copy constructor the default constructor will no longer be generated by the compiler. Then in the derived class call the base class's copy constructor.

public class Base
{
    public int Name { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }

    public Base()
    { }

    public Base(Base toCopy)
    {
        this.Name = toCopy.Name;
        this.Address = toCopy.Address;
    }
}

public class Derived : Base
{
    public String Field { get; set; }

    public Derived(Base toCopy)
        : base (toCopy)
    { }

    // if desired you'll need a parameterless constructor here too
    // so you can instantiate Derived w/o needing an instance of Base
    public Derived()
    { }
}
share|improve this answer

You can always use Object.MemberwiseClone to copy it.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.memberwiseclone.aspx

Or implement the IClonable interface: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.icloneable.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
How you can use the MemberwiseClone in this case? It will produce the base class, not the derived one. – VMAtm Dec 29 '14 at 9:02

Another approach would be to map the base class to derived class:

/// <summary>
/// Maps the source object to target object.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of target object.</typeparam>
/// <typeparam name="TU">Type of source object.</typeparam>
/// <param name="target">Target object.</param>
/// <param name="source">Source object.</param>
/// <returns>Updated target object.</returns>
public static T Map<T, TU>(this T target, TU source)
{
    // get property list of the target object.
    // this is a reflection extension which simply gets properties (CanWrite = true).
    var tprops = target.GetProperties();

    tprops.ToList().ForEach(prop =>
    {
        // check whether source object has the the property
        var sp = source.GetType().GetProperty(prop);
        if (sp != null)
        {
            // if yes, copy the value to the matching property
            var value = sp.GetValue(source, null);
            target.GetType().GetProperty(prop).SetValue(target, value, null);
        }
    });

    return target;
}

Example:

var derivedClass = new DerivedClass();
derivedClass.Map(baseClass);
share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree with your answer - but your code is wrong - corrected (slightly) version added as an edit to your post (hope thats ok) – Rob Jun 17 '14 at 8:28

I came up with a pretty good pattern for dealing with this situation.

public class Base
{
    public int BaseField;

    /// <summary>
    /// Apply the state of the passed object to this object.       
    /// </summary>
    public virtual void ApplyState(Base obj)
    {
        BaseField = obj.BaseField;
    }
}

public class Derived : Base
{
    public int DerivedField;

    public override void ApplyState(Base obj)
    {
        var src = srcObj as Derived;

        if (src != null)
        {
            DerivedField = src.DerivedField;
        }

        base.ApplyState(srcObj);        
    }
}

Given any two objects that share type 'Base', you can apply A to B or B to A.

share|improve this answer

Just change this.

Derived d = (Derived)b;

Also, your name data type should be string, not int

share|improve this answer
1  
that can't work. you'd need to cast it at least, and then you'd still be in trouble – bas Jan 30 '13 at 21:17
    
Base is not assignable to Derived. – O. R. Mapper Jan 30 '13 at 21:18
2  
This won't compile; a Base is not a type of Derived, it's the other way around. – Servy Jan 30 '13 at 21:18
    
you cant cast from base to a derived type – Casper_2211 Jan 30 '13 at 21:23

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