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I've been working with Backbone a few days, reading up on design patterns and what have you. Today I was messing with sub-views, after reading a bunch of resources. Primarily, these 2 posts-

Derrick Bailey
http://lostechies.com/derickbailey/2011/09/15/zombies-run-managing-page-transitions-in-backbone-apps/

Ian Storm Taylor
http://ianstormtaylor.com/assigning-backbone-subviews-made-even-cleaner/

These and others were very useful for helping me set up some subViews and handle their closing in what I thought was a correct pattern:

Backbone.View.prototype.close = function(){
    var ctx = this;
    _.each(ctx.subViews(), function(view) {
        view.close();
    });
    this.remove();
    this.unbind();
}

No problems here, seems to do what I expected. But I wanted to test it, just to see what happened. So I stopped calling close on subViews and looped my render like 20,000 times:

Backbone.View.prototype.close = function(){
    var ctx = this;
    _.each(ctx.subViews(), function(view) {
        //view.close();
    });
    this.remove();
    this.unbind();
}

No zombie event handlers or DOM nodes here. This was a little surprising to me - I'm not an expert in jQuery's internals and I expected to still have the event handlers from the child nodes at least. But I guess because my subViews are all contained within the parent view, which was still being removed and unbound, jQuery clears all the children fine. So I stopped unbinding the parent element:

Backbone.View.prototype.close = function(){
    var ctx = this;
    _.each(ctx.subViews(), function(view) {
        //view.close();
    });
    this.remove();
    //this.unbind();
}

My event handler count in the Chrome inspector still didn't go up.

So my question are:

What is a "real" example of when you need to cleverly handle event unbinding and subViews in this way? Is it any object reference outside of the immediate scope of your View? Is it only if your subviews aren't contained by the parent view's $el?

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1 Answer 1

When you remove a parent view from the DOM, jQuery does clean up any DOM events that were hooked up in the children. unbind() is an alias for Backbone's Events.off, which removes any events you may have hooked up using myChildView.on('someEvent', ...). For example, a parent view might listen to an event you trigger inside a child view. If you did that, you would need the call to this.unbind() or this.off().

Now that Backbone.Events (as of 0.9.9) has listenTo() and stopListening(), you could consider adding this.stopListening() to your close(). Then if, within your view, you used something like this.listenTo(this.model, ...) they would also be cleaned up properly.

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Thanks Paul. I played around with the event binding some more, in an attempt to more fully understand it. You say "a parent view might listen to an event you trigger inside a child view. If you did that, you would need the call to this.unbind() or this.off()." I think I had not created those properly the first time, so I bound some handlers across the views and subViews (in response to their renders) and didn't clean them up, but still had no zombie events. Is there a detail regarding this which your answer did not include, or perhaps a specific example you could provide? –  iabw Jan 31 '13 at 17:24
1  
I think it is all cleaned up because you only hooked up events between the views/subviews. Since they only referenced each other, they are GC'd properly. A problem would be when you have a subview listen to something that has a longer lifespan (maybe a model or parent view which is not closed). Also, view.remove() does call stopListening() already, so you would not need to add that to close. Check this article out. –  Paul Hoenecke Feb 1 '13 at 2:08

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