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Want to ask what happens if I write the following and run the program.

new int[5]; // without assigning it to a pointer.

The compilation passed.

But will there be a 5 * sizeof(int) chunk of memory allocated?

What if it is an object?

new some_obj_[5]; // without assigning it to a pointer.

Will the constructor of some_obj_ be invoked?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
new int[5];//without assigning it to a pointer.

Yes, there will be a 5*sizeof(int) chunk of memory allocated but inaccessible to you, since you didn't save the pointer. You will have a memory leak.

new some_obj_[5];//without assigning it to a pointer.

Yes, there will be 5*sizeof(some_obj_) chunk of memory allocated but inaccessible to you, since you didn't save the pointer. The default constructor for some_obj_ will be called 5 times. That should be trivial to verify. Depending on how some_obj_ is coded you may have a memory leak.

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+1 for the good point about the class type not leaking in certain situations –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 30 '13 at 22:23
    
Is there a way to detect this? e.g. overload the new operator? or use smartpointer? –  alex wang Jan 30 '13 at 22:37
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Well, you can detect it by looking at the code. Beyond that, you can't really overload or use some intrinsic feature of the core language to ensure the user saves the new pointer and prevent leaks. –  Nik Bougalis Jan 30 '13 at 22:43
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thanks a lot, ;D –  alex wang Jan 30 '13 at 22:46
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@alexwang: Most compilers have a warning that will tell you that you failed to use the result of a function (I believe (but am not sure) this will also work here). Turn on this warning and fix all warnings. –  Loki Astari Jan 30 '13 at 23:06

Yes, the array of objects will be dynamically allocated and in the second case the default constructor of some_obj_ will be called. Since you don't store the pointer, you've lost any way to access the objects or delete[] the array, so you have a memory leak.

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It's conceivable that the some_obj_ allocation doesn't leak. Unlikely, but conceivable. The int allocation will definitely leak. –  Nik Bougalis Jan 30 '13 at 22:20
new int[5];//without assigning it to a pointer.

But will there be a 5-sizeof(int) chunk of memory allocated?

YES, 5-sizeof(int) chunk of memory allocated and 5 ints are not initialized to 0

What if it is an object?

new some_obj_[5];//without assigning it to a pointer.
Will the constructor of 'some_obj_' be invoked?

Yes, sizeof(some_obj_) * 5 of memory block will be allocated and default constructor of some_obj_ will be called 5 times to initialize each element.

You are leaking these memories as you don't have pointers point to them, you can't not call delete [] to deallocate the memory block.

See new [] wiki page

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