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I am trying to concatenate two strings and then make a system call in a UNIX environmental. The program does what I want but terminates with the error *** stack smashing detected ***

Why is this happening?

Here is my code:

main(int argc, const char* argv[])
{

    //Check if there is an arg otehr than file name
    if(argc > 1)
    {
        int i;
        //argv[0] is prog name start at 1.
        for(i=1; i<argc; i++)
        {

            char st1[] = "wc -l ";
            strcat(st1, argv[i]);
            printf("%s",system(st1));
        }

    }
    else
    {
        printf("\nExiting. No input files given.\n");
    }
    return 0;
}
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3  
sounds naughty... the issue is obvious. you're smashing the stack! –  thang Jan 30 '13 at 22:23
    
This problem is one that a book should have been able to answer. Our time is better used on people who have read their book, completed the exercises successfully and are still having problems. Which book are you reading? –  undefined behaviour Jan 31 '13 at 3:44
    
@modifiablelvalue, 50 shades of... –  thang Jan 31 '13 at 18:03
    
@modifiablevalue I'm not reading a book. I'm just writing programs as they come to me when I have a new idea and learning via the web. I don't see how this is not a relevant question to stackoverflow. If you think its a waste of time then don't answer it or flag it. –  Nick Jan 31 '13 at 20:48
    
@Nick If you need to ask stackoverflow what's wrong with this code then your current method of learning clearly isn't working. How can you be sure that your C programs will continue to work well into the future, on systems unimaginably different to those existing today? The problem with undefined behaviour is that it might appear to work as intended until an otherwise meaningless update to compiler or system. I suggest K&R's "The C Programming Language, Second Edition". –  undefined behaviour Feb 2 '13 at 10:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

str1 is not large enough to contain the resulting string as it only has enough elements to contain wc -l \0 (it is a char[7] array). The call to strcat() writes beyond the bounds of the array, overwriting memory it should not.

Dynamically allocate enough space, calculated based on the length of the incoming argument to ensure enough memory is available:

char* s = malloc(7 + strlen(argv[i])); /* 7 is 6 for "wc -l " and null term. */
if (s)
{
    sprintf(s, "wc -l %s", argv[i]);

    free(s);
}
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char st1[] = "wc -l ";
strcat(st1, argv[i]);

st1 will be allocated on the stack, just large enough for the string constant used to initialise it. You then append another string, potentially (almost certainly) corrupting the stack.

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