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It is working really good except sometimes (noticed on vista only so far)

I am trying to create a robust Async Socket.BeginReceive process. Currently all I do is connect to the server, server acknowledges connection and sends a file to the client. Client parses a prefix, and processes the file via BinaryWriter.

TCP *BufferSize = 1024*

EDIT: Have re-worked functionality to make it more robust *Workflow is as follows;*

Send: - I send 8 byte prefix packet which is two integers. (First Int is the file size expected, second int is the prefix size expected, then the file itself is next.

Receive:

  • After I have undoubtedly received the first 8 bytes, I process the prefix converting the first 4 bytes into an integer (file size byte length) then convert the next 4 bytes into an integer (prefix size byte length)

  • I then undoubtedly receive the prefix size byte length off the buffer, and process my prefix.

  • I then begin to receive my file based on file size byte length store in the prefix message.

Problem: Everything works good locally. I have tested checksums and file data after sending and receiving and everything looks good.

However commercial environment (noticed on vista), once in a while (not always, most of the time transmission is successful) I will get a System.IO.IOException: The process cannot access the file 'C:\TestReceived.txt' ... Here is a screen shot of the exact error.

What I think's going on, is since the beginRecieve is being called async on a separate thread, sometimes both threads try to access the filestream at the same time via BinaryWriter.

I tried initalizing the Binary writer with FileShare.None as I read that it will lock the file.

BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(File.Open(state.receivedPath, FileMode.Append,FileAccess.Write,FileShare.None));

It doesn't seem to be locking the file as expected because this does not resolve the issue.

Question: Can any of the guru's direct me how to properly lock the FileStream? I have indicated in the ReceiveCallback where I believe I am going wrong.

EDIT: Solution: So I ended up discovering that perhaps I wasnt cleaning up my resources used to create / append to the file. I've switched to the using statement to initialize my FileStream object and BinaryWriter object in hopes that it would manage the clean up better, and it seems to be working :) Have not had a failed test all day. Now time to handle exceptions on the server side! Thank you all for your help.

enter image description here

    private static void ReceiveCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        try
        {
            // Retrieve the state object and the client socket 
            // from the asynchronous state object.
            StateObject state = (StateObject)ar.AsyncState;
            Socket client = state.workSocket;

            // Read data from the remote device.
            int bytesRead = client.EndReceive(ar);
            state.totalBytesRead += bytesRead;
            if (bytesRead > 0)
            {
                if (state.flag == 0)
                {
                    if (state.totalBytesRead >= 8)
                    {
                        // we know we put the msgLen / prefixLen as the first 8 bytes on the stream
                        state.msgLen = BitConverter.ToInt32(state.buffer, 0);
                        state.prefixLen = BitConverter.ToInt32(state.buffer, 4);
                        state.flag = 1;
                        // good to process the first 2 integer values on the stream
                        //state.sb.Append(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(state.buffer, 8, bytesRead));

                        int prefixRequestBytes = state.prefixLen;


                        if (prefixRequestBytes > StateObject.BufferSize)
                            prefixRequestBytes = StateObject.BufferSize;

                        state.lastSendByteCount = prefixRequestBytes;
                        state.totalBytesRead = 0;

                        // start re-writing to the begining of the buffer since we saved
                        client.BeginReceive(state.buffer, 0, prefixRequestBytes, 0, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
                        return;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        int bytesToSend = state.lastSendByteCount - bytesRead;
                        state.lastSendByteCount = bytesToSend;
                        // need to receive atleast first 8 bytes to continue
                        // Get the rest of the data.
                        client.BeginReceive(state.buffer, state.totalBytesRead, bytesToSend, 0, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
                        return;
                    }
                }
                if (state.flag == 1)
                {
                    // we are expexing to process the prefix
                    if (state.totalBytesRead >= state.prefixLen)
                    {
                        // we are good to process
                        // Lets always assume that our prefixMsg can fit into our prefixbuffer ( we wont send greater than prefixbuffer)
                        state.sb.Append(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(state.buffer,0,state.prefixLen));
                        string prefixMsg = state.sb.ToString();

                        state.receivedPath = @"C:\TestReceived.txt";

                        state.flag++;
                        int msgRequestBytes = state.msgLen;
                        if (msgRequestBytes > StateObject.BufferSize)
                            msgRequestBytes = StateObject.BufferSize;

                        state.lastSendByteCount = msgRequestBytes;
                        state.totalBytesRead = 0;

                        // should be good to process the msg now
                        // start re-writing to the begining of the buffer since we saved
                        client.BeginReceive(state.buffer, 0, msgRequestBytes, 0, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
                        return;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        int bytesToSend = state.lastSendByteCount - bytesRead;
                        state.lastSendByteCount = bytesToSend;
                        // request the rest of the prefix
                        // Get the rest of the data.
                        client.BeginReceive(state.buffer, state.totalBytesRead, bytesToSend, 0, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
                        return;
                    }
                }

                // we are expecting to process the file
                if (state.flag > 1)
                {
                    // I think here, the binarywriter needs to be locked
                    if (state.totalBytesRead >= state.msgLen)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Writing final {0} bytes to server", bytesRead);

                        BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(File.Open(state.receivedPath, FileMode.Append,FileAccess.Write,FileShare.None));

                            writer.Write(state.buffer, 0, bytesRead);
                            writer.Close();


                        Console.WriteLine("Finished reading file");
                    }
                    else
                    {

                        Console.WriteLine("Reading {0} bytes from server...", bytesRead);
                        // Padd these bytes
                        BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(File.Open(state.receivedPath, FileMode.Append, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None));

                            writer.Write(state.buffer, 0, bytesRead);
                            writer.Close();



                        // get how many more bytes are left to read
                        int bytesToSend = state.msgLen - bytesRead;

                        if (bytesToSend > StateObject.BufferSize)
                            bytesToSend = StateObject.BufferSize;

                        client.BeginReceive(state.buffer, 0, bytesToSend, 0, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
                        return;

                    }
                }

            }
            else
            {
                // All the data has arrived;

            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
        }
    }

My send is quite straight forward because I use the Socket.BeginSendFile(..); All I do here is tack on my prefix, and send the file.

            private static void Send(Socket handler)
    {
        string msg = "Fetching...<EOF>";
        byte[] prefixMsg = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(msg);

        FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(@"C:\test.txt");
        byte[] fileLen = BitConverter.GetBytes(fi.Length); // The length of the file msg, we will use this to determin stream len
        byte[] prefixMsgLen = BitConverter.GetBytes(prefixMsg.Length); // the length of the prefix msg, we will use this to determin head len

        // copy out prefix to a prefix byte array
        byte[] prefix = new byte[ 4 + 4 + prefixMsg.Length];
        fileLen.CopyTo(prefix, 0);
        prefixMsgLen.CopyTo(prefix, 4);
        prefixMsg.CopyTo(prefix, 8);

        // *** Receive design requires prefixmsg.length to fit into prefix buffer

        handler.BeginSendFile(fi.FullName, prefix, null, 0, new AsyncCallback(AsynchronousFileSendCallback), handler);


    }

Thank you very much for your time.

share|improve this question
    
@I4V it is hard to debug because it only fails in a commercial environment, without my debugger! –  clamchoda Jan 30 '13 at 22:49
    
There could be a difference between your pc, intranet and internet ? Does it work between 2 pc's in your office ? Also are you doing multiple transmissions ie, say 2 files in the one session ? if so your last read on the first file may contain the prefix and some of the data for the second file. I could be wrong but i'm not sure you've covered that. Otherwise, i'd put try/catch on your begin's and ends & writes and see what's throwing up exceptions. –  andrew Jan 30 '13 at 23:12
    
It only works on one machine, just tested it out accross multiple machines in the office. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't when not run locally :( –  clamchoda Jan 30 '13 at 23:38
    
@andrew yes multiple transmissions, testing with 8 different files, about 1 gig of data. –  clamchoda Jan 31 '13 at 0:19
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are aware that the amount of bytes received in a single read operation might be as low as 1 byte, regardless of the amount requested?

This being the case, you need to read again (asynchronously) until you have received the number of bytes that you expect.

I would also suggest that you gather better data at the point of failure. Consider using http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.appdomain.unhandledexception.aspx with a logging library to capture more info. In the mean time, have you taken a look at the windows application log on the affected machine? There should be a basic stacktrace of sorts in there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. No I was not aware of 1 byte scenario but that is an eye opener as to why my application is not working. Going to give a go at this tmrw at work as I had to go home, late night :( –  clamchoda Jan 30 '13 at 23:39
    
Could you help me determine if this logic is failsafe? I'll send the size of transmission in the prefix of my beginsendfile which I will have a predetermined size for that so I know when to stop expecting my prefix. 1) Recall BeginReceive if bytesread does not equal prefix length. 2) store expected message length in the state object 2) BeginReceive until message length –  clamchoda Jan 31 '13 at 0:02
    
Sounds good... just buffer up all your reads (perhaps in a memorystream) until you hit the length indicated in your initial length field. –  spender Jan 31 '13 at 0:05
    
And.. in your last read, in addition to getting the last bits of the current transmission, check to see if you've got partial or whole of the next prefix.. and/or partial/whole of the next transmission. –  andrew Jan 31 '13 at 4:55
    
...or don't request more than you need –  spender Jan 31 '13 at 8:52
show 3 more comments

It is not clear from your question what the type of socket it is, but I will assume, it is TCP.

It seems that you are experiencing the classical error of TCP programming.

When you send, for ex., N bytes, you can not assume that you will read/receive N bytes at the first call. TCP will finally deliver the N bytes but it may require more calls of read/receive. Check how many bytes you receive (bytesRead) when you call handler.EndReceive(ar);

share|improve this answer
    
Yes TCP sorry for not being specific. Going to work on some of the suggestions here tonight, and report back tomorrow. Thanks all for your time. –  clamchoda Jan 30 '13 at 23:40
    
Hey I4V thank you for your suggestions, I have implemented a much better work flow. Unfortunate I run into a new problem when deployed off my local machine. See my edits and throw any suggestions my way good sir! Thanks –  clamchoda Jan 31 '13 at 19:46
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