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Given an expression in the form of : (* 3 (+ x y)), how can I evaluate the expression so as to put it in the form (+ (* 3 x) (* 3 y))? (note: in the general case, 3 is any constant, and "x" or "y" could be terms of single variables or other s-expressions (e.g. (+ 2 x)).

How do I write a lambda expression that will recursively evaluate the items (atoms?) in the original expression and determine whether they are a constant or a term? In the case of a term, it would then need to be evaluated again recursively to determine the type of each item in that term's list.

Again, the crux of the issue for me is the recursive "kernel" of the definition.

I would obviously need a base case that would determine once I have reached the last, single atom in the deepest part of the expression. Then recursively work "back up", building the expression in the proper form according to rules.

Coming from a Java / C++ background I am having great difficulty in understanding how to do this syntactically in Scheme.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Let's take a quick detour from the original problem to something slightly related. Say that you're given the following: you want to write an evaluator that takes "string-building" expressions like (* 3 "hello") and "evaluates" it to "hellohellohello". Other examples that we'd like to make work include things like

(+ "rock" (+ (* 5 "p") "aper"))     ==> "rockpppppaper"
(* 3 (+ "scis" "sors"))             ==> "scissorsscissorsscissors"

To tackle a problem like this, we need to specify exactly what the shape of the inputs are. Essentially, we want to describe a data-type. We'll say that our inputs are going to be "string-expressions". Let's call them str-exprs for short. Then let's define what it means to be a str-expr.

A str-expr is either:

  1. <string>
  2. (+ <str-expr> <str-expr>)
  3. (* <number> <str-expr>)

By this notation, we're trying to say that str-exprs will all fit one of those three shapes.

Once we have a good idea of what the shape of the data is, we have a better guide to write functions that process str-exprs: they must case-analyze those three alternatives!

;; A str-expr is either:
;;      a plain string, or
;;     (+ str-expr str-expr), or
;;     (* number str-expr)

;; We want to write a definition to "evaluate" such string-expressions.

;; evaluate: str-expr -> string
(define (evaluate expr)
  (cond
    [(string? expr)
     ...]
    [(eq? (first expr) '+)
     ...]
    [(eq? (first expr) '*)
     ...]))

where the '...'s are things that we'll be filling in.

Actually, we know how to fill in a little more about the '...': we know that in the second and third cases, the inner parts are themselves str-exprs. Those are prime spots where recurrence will probably happen: since our data is described in terms of itself, the programs that process them will also probably need to refer to themselves. In short, programs that process str-exprs will almost certainly follow this shape:

(define (evaluate expr)
  (cond
    [(string? expr)
     ... expr 
     ...]
    [(eq? (first expr) '+)
     ... (evaluate (second expr))
     ... (evaluate (third expr))
     ...]
    [(eq? (first expr) '*)
     ... (second expr) 
     ... (evaluate (third expr))
     ...]))

That's all without even doing any real work: we can figure this part out just purely because that's what the data's shape tells us. Filling in the remainder of the '...'s to make this all work out is actually not too bad, especially when we also consider the test cases we've cooked up. (Code)

It's this kind of standard data-analysis/case-analysis that's at the heart of your question, and it's one that's covered extensively by curricula such as HTDP. This is not Scheme or Racket specific: you'd do the same kind of data analysis in Java, and you see the same kind of approach in many other places. In Java, the low-mechanism used for the case analysis might be done differently, perhaps with dynamic dispatch, but the core ideas are all the same. You need to describe the data. Once you have a data definition, use it to help you sketch out what the code needs to look like to process that data. Use test cases to triangulate how to fill in the sketch.

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Excellent explanation. Than you very much. –  runit Jan 31 '13 at 16:32

You need to break down your problem. I would start by following the HtDP (www.htdp.org) approach. What are your inputs? Can you specify them precisely? In this case, those inputs are going to be self-referential.

Then, specify the output form. In fact, your text above is a little fuzzy on this: I think I know what your output form looks like, but I'm not entirely sure.

Next, write a set of tests. These should be based on the structure of your input terms; start with the simplest ones, and work upward from there.

Once you have a good set of tests, implementing the function should be pretty straightforward. I'd be glad to help if you get stuck!

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Great reference. I'll check that out. Thanks very much. –  runit Jan 31 '13 at 16:34

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