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I have an array u_char * that is created with malloc's and it is holding a string. it is actually larger than the length of the string.

I want to use snprintf() to append another array to the beginning of this, and store in another array.

so I have something like this

u_char * newstorage = (u_char *)malloc(strlen(first) + strlen(second));
snprintf(newstorage, "%s%s", first, second);

should this work no matter the content of first or second, or do they need to have special considerations (starting or ending with \0 or anything)?

first and second are both dynamically allocated u_char arrays.

The problem is that it seems like newstorage at the end does not hold the complete string, rather just a subset of what it should contain. Will there be any problems if either first or second contains an errant \0 in the middle of the strings or something? (Highly possible since i have no control over them).

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1) u_char * newstorage = malloc(1+strlen(first) + strlen(second)); 2) why use sprintf if the same can be accomplished with two memcpy()s ? 3) why not use sprintf()s return value ? –  wildplasser Jan 30 '13 at 23:49

3 Answers 3

You should allocate strlen(first) + strlen(second) + 1.

if either first or second contains an errant \0 in the middle of the strings or something

Then they are not C strings and you have no business using string-functions like strlen on them. You should be using memcpy instead of snprintf.

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Should this work no matter the content of first or second, or do they need to have special considerations (starting or ending with \0 or anything)?

You're using string functions, so these need to be proper C strings: i.e., they must be terminated with a '\0' character, and there can't be any other NULs in the strings.

If these are actually binary data rather than strings then you can't use string functions like strlen and sprintf. I guess I'll write two different answers for these two different cases.

Strings

If these are proper NUL-terminated C strings, then:

  1. Don't forget to include space for a '\0' character.
  2. The cast to (u_char *) is unnecessary.
  3. Does this even compile? The second parameter to snprintf ought to be the number of bytes size to write.
  4. The compiler should also complain about passing a u_char * rather than a char *.

Given all this, I'd write the code as:

size_t  size = strlen(first) + strlen(second) + 1;
u_char *str  = malloc(size);

if (str == NULL) {
    /* handle error */
}
else {
    snprintf((char *) str, size, "%s%s", first, second);
}

Actually, you could opt for the simpler sprintf in this case since you know the strings will always fit.

sprintf((char *) str, "%s%s", first, second);

Binary data

If these are binary data then you can't use string functions like strlen and sprintf. You'll have to rewrite the code to avoid them.

There's no automatic way to figure out how long a byte array is. That's information you have to keep track of yourself.

size_t  firstSize  = /* ??? */; 
size_t  secondSize = /* ??? */; 
u_char *newStorage = malloc(firstSize + secondSize);

To copy arbitrary bytes around use memcpy or memmove.

if (newStorage == NULL) {
    /* handle error */
}
else {
    memcpy(newStorage,             first,  firstSize);
    memcpy(newStorage + firstSize, second, secondSize);
}
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There are numerous ways to do this, of which this is one. The problem in your case is that you haven't allowed space for the terminating NULL in the newly allocated array.

Using snprintf in this fashion is inefficient, I'm not sure if that is an issue to you. You could equally allocate a new array and use strcpy to concatenate your arrays.

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