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Yes, generics are a recurrent subject, and here it goes again...

Currently, I have this code. Processor is a "simple", generic interface.

public final class ProcessorChain<IN extends MessageProvider, OUT extends MessageProvider>
    implements Processor<IN, OUT>
{
    /**
     * The resulting processor
     */
    private final Processor<IN, OUT> p;

    /**
     * Start a processing chain with a single processor
     *
     * @param p the processor
     * @param <X> the input type
     * @param <Y> the output type
     * @return a single element processing chain
     */
    public static <X extends MessageProvider, Y extends MessageProvider>
        ProcessorChain<X, Y> startWith(final Processor<X, Y> p)
    {
        return new ProcessorChain<X, Y>(p);
    }

    /**
     * Private constructor
     *
     * @param p the processor
     */
    private ProcessorChain(final Processor<IN, OUT> p)
    {
        this.p = p;
    }

    /**
     * Add an existing processor to that chain
     *
     * <p>Note that this returns a <b>new</b> chain.</p>
     *
     * @param p2 the processor to add
     * @param <NEWOUT> the return type for that new processor
     * @return a new chain consisting of the previous chain with the new
     * processor appended
     */
    public <NEWOUT extends MessageProvider> ProcessorChain<IN, NEWOUT>
        chainWith(final Processor<OUT, NEWOUT> p2)
    {
        return new ProcessorChain<IN, NEWOUT>(merge(p, p2));
    }

    public Processor<IN, OUT> end()
    {
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public OUT process(final ProcessingReport report, final IN input)
        throws ProcessingException
    {
        return p.process(report, input);
    }

    /**
     * Merge two processors
     *
     * @param p1 the first processor
     * @param p2 the second processor
     * @param <X> the input type of {@code p1}
     * @param <Y> the output type of {@code p1} and input type of {@code p2}
     * @param <Z> the output type of {@code p2}
     * @return a processor resulting of applying {@code p2} to the output of
     * {@code p1}
     */
    private static <X extends MessageProvider, Y extends MessageProvider, Z extends MessageProvider>
        Processor<X, Z> merge(final Processor<X, Y> p1, final Processor<Y, Z> p2)
    {
        return new Processor<X, Z>()
        {
            @Override
            public Z process(final ProcessingReport report, final X input)
                throws ProcessingException
            {
                return p2.process(report, p1.process(report, input));
            }
        };
    }
}

So, currently, I can write:

// p1 does <X, Y>, p2 does <Y, Z>, p3 does <Z, T>
Processor<X, T> p = ProcessingChain.startWith(p1).chainWith(p2).chainWith(p3).end();

And it works. In fact, I've never been that far into generics.

What I'd like to be able to write is this:

Processor<X, T> p = ProcessingChain.start().add(p1).add(p2).add(p3).end();

I've been battling trying to do this, but failed.

One reason I want to be able to do this is also, in the future, to be able to write:

Processor<X, T> p = ProcessingChain.start().add(p1).stopOnError().etc().etc()

And I feel that if I know how to .start(), "utility" processors along the way won't be a problem.

So, how do do that?

share|improve this question
1  
You're going to have to define "but failed", what you are actually trying to do, and what you expect the results to be. As-is, there's no question here. It seems like you're trying to mash together a Builder and a fluent interface here; pick one. –  Brian Roach Jan 31 '13 at 0:11
    
Isn't it obvious what I'm trying to do? –  fge Jan 31 '13 at 0:13
    
@BrianRoach In my experience Builders are often presented as fluent interfaces! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Builder_pattern –  sharakan Jan 31 '13 at 0:38
    
@sharakan indeed, but that "no question" here leaves me flabbergasted, I think I have given all elements necessary to see the problem. –  fge Jan 31 '13 at 0:40
1  
@fge I see what you're getting at, but I think it would help the question to include an attempt to implement start with a corresponding compile error. –  Paul Bellora Jan 31 '13 at 0:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What should a parameterless start method return? This is the crux of the issue, though you've only alluded to it in your question.

Note that you've declared ProcessorChain as implementing Processor - so any instance of ProcessorChain must act like one. For that reason, creating a ProcessorChain instance without a Processor to wrap doesn't make sense.

In general, I would say that a builder should not implement the interface of what it builds, but having written that I think I'd at least be interested in seeing counter-arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
That is indeed the core of the question, I thought about an identity processor and initiate with it. But since then I have found the solution... –  fge Jan 31 '13 at 1:09
1  
@fge please post your solution and mark it accepted –  Miserable Variable Jan 31 '13 at 1:13
    
@MiserableVariable I was posting it while you typed this, it seems –  fge Jan 31 '13 at 1:16
    
@PaulBellora, I do agree with what you say when you say "a builder should not implement the interface of what it builds". –  fge Jan 31 '13 at 1:17

There's no way for a naked start method to infer the types that the resulting ProcessorChain would have to be. Further, as @PaulBellora points out, the start() method itself as you've sketched out couldn't be a Processor, because it doesn't have enough information.

You could use a separate class as the result of a start() method, although it couldn't be parameterless. e.g:

public class ProcessorChainFactory<M extends MessageProvider> {

    public static <X extends MessageProvider> ProcessorChainFactory<X> start() {
        return null;
    }

    public static <X extends MessageProvider> ProcessorChainFactory<X> start(Class<X> clazz) {
        return null;
    }

    public <X extends MessageProvider> ProcessorChain<M, X> add(Processor<M, X> processor) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }        
}

which can then be called in a couple of ways:

    Processor<MessageProvider1, Final> processor = ...;

    ProcessorChain<MessageProvider1, Final> processor1 = ProcessorChainFactory.<MessageProvider1> start().add(processor);
    ProcessorChain<MessageProvider1, Final> processor2 = ProcessorChainFactory.start(MessageProvider1.class).add(processor);

My feeling is that doesn't get you much further than your current ProcessingChain.startWith(p1), but maybe it's helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually did something very close to that. Thanks for the code samples! –  fge Jan 31 '13 at 1:29

Well, OK, there is a way although it is a little hackish:

public static <X extends MessageProvider> ProcessorChain<X, X> start()
{
    final Processor<X, X> p = new Processor<X, X>()
    {
        @Override
        public X process(final ProcessingReport report, final X input)
            throws ProcessingException
        {
            return input;
        }
    };

    return new ProcessorChain<X, X>(p);
}

It won't work outright however. With types S, ValidationData and P, p1 doing <S, ValidationData> and p2 doing <ValidationData, P>, writing:

ProcessorChain.start().chainWith(p1).chainWith(p2).end()

leads to this compile error:

<NEWOUT>chainWith(Processor<MessageProvider,NEWOUT>) 
in ProcessorChain<MessageProvider,MessageProvider>
cannot be applied to
(Processor<S,ValidationData>)

The code above was my first attempt...

But if I write:

ProcessorChain.<S>start().chainWith(p1).chainWith(p2).end()

then it works!

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you worked around it by implementing an "identity processor" :) I disagree with the design but +1 for tackling the immediate issue. –  Paul Bellora Jan 31 '13 at 1:25
    
Yeah but I'm gonna scratch that with something else; I realize the design is a little fragile. –  fge Jan 31 '13 at 1:28

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