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So here is my header:

//warehouse.h
#ifndef WAREHOUSE_H
#define WAREHOUSE_H
#include<string>
#include<map>
#include "dates.h"

namespace a4
{
  class warehouse
  {
      public:
          warehouse(std::string name, std::string start_date);

      private:
          std::string name;
          std::string busiest_day;
          int most_transactions;
          dates current_date;
          std::map<std::string, a4::food> items;
          void next_day();

  };
}
#endif

My .cc:

//warehouse.cc
#include "warehouse.h"
#include "dates.h"
namespace a4
{
 //constructor
 warehouse::warehouse(std::string wname, std::string start_date)
 {
     wname = name;
     current_date = dates(start_date);

 }
 void warehouse::next_day()
 {
     current_date.next_day();
 }
}

And the compiler error:

warehouse.cc: In constructor ‘a4::warehouse::warehouse(std::string, std::string)’:
warehouse.cc:6: error: no matching function for call to ‘a4::dates::dates()’
dates.h:10: note: candidates are: a4::dates::dates(std::string)
dates.h:8: note:                 a4::dates::dates(const a4::dates&)

From the error it looks like its calling a zero argument constructor instead of the constructor that takes a string. The dates class i built doesn't have a zero argument constructor obviously.

Ive been trying to figure this out for hours any help would be appreciated. In a similar question I was told to look up member initializer lists. I have and don't really understand how to implement it right I guess, cause it doesn't seem to solve the problem.

Were only a few weeks into the semester and this is my first class on c++, go easy on me :)

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closed as too localized by Suma, hjpotter92, Eric J., Sudarshan, WiredPrairie Jan 31 '13 at 2:41

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's because you have dates current_date; as a member of warhouse. When warhouse's constructor is called, the default constructors of all its member variables will be called. You can change the constructors any member variables use with : notation (creating an initializer list):

warehouse::warehouse(std::string wname, std::string start_date)
    : current_date(start_date)
{
    wname = name;
}

Or by simply defining a blank constructor for dates.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried writing a no arg constructor before and it threw the same error –  Deekor Jan 31 '13 at 0:19
    
And this throws a crazy error. I dont want to post it again but its in the comments of the other answers. –  Deekor Jan 31 '13 at 0:29
1  
@Deekor: Update your post saying, "I've tried this as suggested and am now getting this". Others may delete their answers and the info will be lost forever and it's frowned upon to put entire long-running error messages or code in a comment. –  Chief Two Pencils Jan 31 '13 at 1:49

Use initializer list syntax:

warehouse::warehouse(std::string wname, std::string start_date):
    wname(name), current_date(start_date)
{
}

In C++ any variables not listed in a constructor's initializer list are default constructed. The initializer list is how you control what constructor is called so you can avoid default construction.

It's a good practice to initialize all of your class variables this way (when possible).

share|improve this answer
2  
"In C++ any variables not listed in a constructor's initializer list are default constructed" restrictions apply. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 31 '13 at 0:11
    
@LuchianGrigore My understanding is that POD types like int can be thought of as having a no-op default constructor. Would you agree with that or is that wrong? –  John Kugelman Jan 31 '13 at 0:17
    
Now throws: Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64: "a4::dates::dates(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)", referenced from: a4::warehouse::warehouse(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)in cc1Pzdbo.o a4::warehouse::warehouse(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)in cc1Pzdbo.o "_main", referenced from: start in crt1.10.6.o –  Deekor Jan 31 '13 at 0:22
    
I agree it can be thought of like that, yes :) –  Luchian Grigore Jan 31 '13 at 7:02

You have to use an initialization list:

warehouse::warehouse(std::string wname, std::string start_date) : 
   current_date(start_date)
{
 wname = name;
}

non-POD data members are initialized before the constructor body is executed.

share|improve this answer
    
Now throws: Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64: "a4::dates::dates(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)", referenced from: a4::warehouse::warehouse(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)in cc1Pzdbo.o a4::warehouse::warehouse(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)in cc1Pzdbo.o "_main", referenced from: start in crt1.10.6.o –  Deekor Jan 31 '13 at 0:17

You need to call current_date in member initializers list:

 warehouse::warehouse(std::string wname, std::string start_date)
 :current_date (start_date)
 {
     wname = name;
 }

By default, if a class member is not in member initialize list, the default constructor will be called, as dates doens't have default constructor, compiler failed to compile it.

To initialize class member which has no default constructor, the only way is to initialize it in member initializers list.

share|improve this answer
    
don't mind me :) –  Luchian Grigore Jan 31 '13 at 0:10
    
@LuchianGrigore you are always welcome, mate –  billz Jan 31 '13 at 0:12

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