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Can GNU sed be used to ID a pattern based on rows? Or in other words, how can you insert a line break in the pattern you're using sed to ID?

For example, in the following dataset (which is much larger in actuality), I have an error that should have been removed when I searched for duplicates, but was not because the information is slightly different in two rows (which is irrelevant at this point).

In this case, I want to remove the error entirely from the original file.In other words, if, within my file, two rows of rs#### follow each other, I would like to erase these two copies, and also the six lines that follow them. It would be nice to relocate them to a new file, but what is most critical is that they are removed from the original.

rs1038864   16  73762557    A   G
1   1633    0.5835  -0.0004 0.0035
1   1643    0.8902  0.004436    0.004354
0   0   0   0   0
rs1019567   16  83343715    G   T
rs1019567   16  83343715    G   T
1   1641    0.4692  0.0009  0.0035
1   559 0.4612  -0.0025 0.0060
1   1643    0.5178  -0.002244   0.002745
1   1643    0.5178  -0.002244   0.002745
1   1909    0.493842692 0.0008  0.0027
1   1950    0.493842692 0.0008  0.0027
rs1038556   16  55132072    C   T
1   6388    0.7773  0.0020  0.0044
1   6843    0.1161  0.001379    0.004275
1   1509    0.978660942 0.0041  0.0096
rs1019797   16  87788686    C   G
rs1019797   16  87788686    C   G
1   1639    0.717   0.0022  0.0038
1   5557    0.7193  0.0020  0.0064
1   1643    0.6691  -0.001044   0.002888
1   6843    0.6691  -0.001044   0.002888
1   1959    0.315280799 -0.0041 0.0032
1   1909    0.315280799 -0.0041 0.0032
rs1038887   16  62660698    A   G
1   1688    0.4947  -0.0028 0.0035
0   0   0   0   0
1   1909    0.464393658 0.0007  0.0028

Something like,

sed -i '/^rs.*d
^rs.*/,+6d' test.data

or perhaps

sed -i '/^rs.*;^rs.*/,+6d' test.data

? Any thoughts would be appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If infile contains the listed input, something like this should do (GNU sed):

<infile sed -r 'N; /([^\n]+)\n\1/ { N; N; N; N; N; N; d }; P; D'

If you want to save the deleted bits to deleted.txt use this:

<infile sed -r 'N; /([^\n]+)\n\1/ { N; N; N; N; N; N; w deleted.txt
d }; P; D'

Note that the w command needs to be terminated by a newline.

Explanation

This loads a second line into the pattern space (N) and checks if the lines are duplicates (/([^\n]+)\n\1/), if the are six more lines are loaded into pattern space and deleted (d).

share|improve this answer
    
Why the I/O redirection at the start of the line instead of as an argument to sed? It works, but it is aconventional. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 31 '13 at 1:46
    
@JonathanLeffler: Believe it or not, I find it more readable, it means I don't have search for the end of the command before discovering what input is being affected. Maybe others don't think so? –  Thor Jan 31 '13 at 1:53
    
This works perfectly, and I appreciate the clarification! –  mfk534 Jan 31 '13 at 2:00
    
Just out of curiosity, is there a way to modify this if the number of lines isn't always 6 following the duplicated rs rows? For example, if it was 5 (or 2, etc.) additional rows, how could I specify: delete the the duplicated rows, and the 5 following, until an unduplicated rs row? –  mfk534 Jan 31 '13 at 2:20
    
@mfk534: You change the number of N's to specify number of extra lines to be deleted. If that number is variable you could do it by detecting non-duplicated rs lines at the end of pattern space, but that is more complicated. A better approach would be to use awk or perl as JonathanLeffler suggested. –  Thor Jan 31 '13 at 2:27

I don't think sed is the right tool for the job (but I may be wrong; it depends in part on whether there are always exactly 6 lines to delete and maybe on whether the adjacent ID lines always have the same ID). You probably can do it with awk, but I'd reach for Perl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $rejects = "reject.lines";
open my $fh, '>', $rejects or die "Failed to create $rejects";

my $old = "";

while (<>)
{
    if ($_ =~ /^rs\d+ /)
    {
        if ($old =~ /^rs\d+ /)
        {
            print $fh $old;
            print $fh $_;
            while (<>)
            {
                last if /^rs\d+ /;
                print $fh $_;
            }
            $old = $_;
            next;
        }
    }
    print $old;
    $old = $_;
}
print $old if $old ne "";
close $fh;

This will handle arbitrary numbers of lines after the adjacent marker lines, and doesn't depend on the two markers being identical.

Output

rs1038864   16  73762557    A   G
1   1633    0.5835  -0.0004 0.0035
1   1643    0.8902  0.004436    0.004354
0   0   0   0   0
rs1038556   16  55132072    C   T
1   6388    0.7773  0.0020  0.0044
1   6843    0.1161  0.001379    0.004275
1   1509    0.978660942 0.0041  0.0096
rs1038887   16  62660698    A   G
1   1688    0.4947  -0.0028 0.0035
0   0   0   0   0
1   1909    0.464393658 0.0007  0.0028

Reject lines

rs1019567   16  83343715    G   T
rs1019567   16  83343715    G   T
1   1641    0.4692  0.0009  0.0035
1   559 0.4612  -0.0025 0.0060
1   1643    0.5178  -0.002244   0.002745
1   1643    0.5178  -0.002244   0.002745
1   1909    0.493842692 0.0008  0.0027
1   1950    0.493842692 0.0008  0.0027
rs1019797   16  87788686    C   G
rs1019797   16  87788686    C   G
1   1639    0.717   0.0022  0.0038
1   5557    0.7193  0.0020  0.0064
1   1643    0.6691  -0.001044   0.002888
1   6843    0.6691  -0.001044   0.002888
1   1959    0.315280799 -0.0041 0.0032
1   1909    0.315280799 -0.0041 0.0032
share|improve this answer
    
I need to become more familiar with perl, thanks for providing this! –  mfk534 Jan 31 '13 at 1:59
    
This is where I out myself as a true perl novice... but where in this script do I specify where the original data file should be read from? Or how do I do so, otherwise? I've been fumbling with it, just using perl Script.pl to run, but it's taking quite a long time and I'm not sure if that's because it's not locating the correct file (because I haven't properly specified it), or because the file is so large. –  mfk534 Jan 31 '13 at 3:11
    
The while (<>) parts read from the files named on the command line, or standard input if no files are named. Thus I was using perl dl.pl data but I could have used perl dl.pl <data too. Or I could have typed perl dl.pl and then typed the data at it. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 31 '13 at 5:55
    
thanks for clarifying. I'm trying to apply this method but having a bit of trouble. I've left the script just as it is (maybe a mistake?), and am using perl script.pl < test.data to run, but my outputs include only a blank rejects.line file. Can you give me a hint as to what I'm doing wrong? I've tried a few other (very basic) perl scripts to make sure it's not a problem with my path to perl. I've also tried changing the script to include: which (<path/to/test.data>), but that produces the same thing. Thanks again for your help, I appreciate it! –  mfk534 Jan 31 '13 at 15:26
    
I'm not sure what's going wrong for you. I tried both 5.16.2 (current, my normal version of Perl) and 5.10.0 (the oldest version I have installed), and they both seemed to work. Are you using a more archaic version of Perl, perchance? I'm not aware of anything to prevent the script working with 5.6 or 5.8, but I've not validated that. I removed the debug lines from the script on SO, but I've just rechecked by copy'n'paste from the answer looking for differences between the two scripts and at the results; no difference. Drop me an email (see my profile) and I'll send you the debugging script. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 31 '13 at 16:13

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