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In the MSDN documentation, it says it returns just directory names("Return Value Type: ... An array of type String containing the names of subdirectories in path."), however in their example code, they recurse without concatenating them, so does that mean they return the full paths?

i.e. their example code:

public static void ProcessDirectory(string targetDirectory) 
    {
        // Process the list of files found in the directory.
        string [] fileEntries = Directory.GetFiles(targetDirectory);
        foreach(string fileName in fileEntries)
            ProcessFile(fileName);

    // Recurse into subdirectories of this directory.
    string [] subdirectoryEntries = Directory.GetDirectories(targetDirectory);
    foreach(string subdirectory in subdirectoryEntries)
        ProcessDirectory(subdirectory);
}

would not work if the GetDirectories method only returned directory names!

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

As specified in the function's MSDN page:

The names returned by this method are prefixed with the directory information provided in path [ed: the parameter to the function].

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Bah, hadn't read that bit properly! Could really do without that happening too. . . – Ed Woodcock Sep 22 '09 at 18:12

It returns full paths. You can verify with PowerShell:

[IO.Directory]::GetDirectories('C:\')
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Never thought of using PowerShell as a quick and dirty .NET REPL. Brilliant! – Michael Richardson Jan 22 '15 at 20:36
    
Or try scriptcs.net – dahlbyk Jan 22 '15 at 20:53

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