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I'm having a mental block trying to make a modified number base convertor.

What I have works correctly, however I want the output to be padded with 0'th character of the base I am using.

For example if I use base 3

int n,v;
char txt[100];
for(n=0;n<5;n++)
{
    ToBase(3,n,txt);
    FromBase(3,&v,txt);
    printf("\n m=%u txt=[%s] i=%u",n,txt,v);
}

Output:

 m=0 txt=[A] i=0
 m=1 txt=[B] i=1
 m=2 txt=[C] i=2
 m=3 txt=[BA] i=3
 m=4 txt=[BB] i=4
 m=5 txt=[BC] i=5
 m=6 txt=[CA] i=6
 m=7 txt=[CB] i=7
 m=8 txt=[CC] i=8
 m=9 txt=[BAA] i=9

The output I need is:

 m=0 txt=[A] i=0
 m=1 txt=[B] i=1
 m=2 txt=[C] i=2
 m=3 txt=[AA] i=3
 m=4 txt=[AB] i=4
 m=5 txt=[AC] i=5
 m=6 txt=[BA] i=6
 m=7 txt=[BB] i=7
 m=8 txt=[BC] i=8
 m=9 txt=[CA] i=9

Here are the functions:

void ToBase(int base,int num,void* str)
{
    char * tbl="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    char buf[66] = {'\0'};
    char * out;
    int n;
    int i,len=0,neg=0;

    if(base>26)
        oof;

    n = ((neg = num < 0)) ? (~num) + 1 : num;
    do {
        buf[len++] = tbl[n % base];
    } while(n /= base);

    out=(char*)str;
    for (i = neg; len > 0; i++)
        out[i] = buf[--len];
}


void FromBase(int base,int* num,void* str)
{
    int i,d,n,sl;
    char*bp;
    bp=(char*)str;
    sl=strlen(bp);
    i=0;
    for(n=0;n<sl;n++)
    {
        i*=base;
        if(bp[n]>='A'&&bp[n]<='Z')
            d=(bp[n]-'A');
        else if(bp[n]>='a'&&bp[n]<='z')
            d=(bp[n]-'a');
        i+=d;
    }
    *num=i;
}

Any help would be greatly appreciated -

share|improve this question
    
please fix your indentation. And, please outline what exactly you mean by "base calculator". –  Dhaivat Pandya Jan 31 '13 at 0:40
    
conversion of one number base to another - if ToBase is called with the first arg as 16 , then Hex would be output, if the arg was 2, then binary etc - –  Ashod Apakian Jan 31 '13 at 0:43
1  
Obviously, there's a problem with either ToBase or FromBase (or both) since your computed value of txt isn't what you want. Equally obviously, nobody is going to be able to help you unless you show us what's going on in ToBase and FromBase. Perhaps not as obviously: your post makes no sense. You say that you are computing things correctly and the problem is padding, yet you show no padding and the output seems wrong. –  Ted Hopp Jan 31 '13 at 0:43
    
Protip: Bases less than ten can be written using only numerals, and 0 can always represent zero. –  Potatoswatter Jan 31 '13 at 0:57
    
This function - is to be used for a domain crawler - ( letters only ) - and I want to convert a domain name <> a number e.g a.com z.com aa.com az.com ba.com etc –  Ashod Apakian Jan 31 '13 at 1:01

2 Answers 2

You need to add a feature so it knows how many characters to output. Just making a minimal change:

     void ToBase                 (int base,int num,void* str,int min_length)
      {
      char * tbl="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
      char buf[66] = {'\0'};
      char * out;
      int n;
      int i,len=0,neg=0;
      if(base>26) oof; /* is a macro? perhaps use assert() */
      n = ((neg = num < 0)) ? (~num) + 1 : num;
      do { buf[len++] = tbl[n % base]; } while(n /= base||--min_length>0);
      out=(char*)str;
      for (i = neg; len > 0; i++) out[i] = buf[--len];
      }
share|improve this answer
    
:) yes oof; is my macro that calls MessageBox(); –  Ashod Apakian Jan 31 '13 at 1:04
    
@AshodApakian Usually we write assert(base>26). You can #undef assert and #define assert(x) do { if(x) oof; } while(0) if you want to migrate to a more portable coding practice… –  Potatoswatter Jan 31 '13 at 1:07
    
oof - actually calls a whole bunch of profiling macros , which are far to intertwined at this point in time - current length of the overall file is a hair of 55k lines - sorry for weird snippet –  Ashod Apakian Jan 31 '13 at 1:09
    
@AshodApakian Actually more reason to make such a change… assert is part of the mechanism that most IDEs and build systems tell you whether you're building in debug or release mode. If you control oof using #ifndef NDEBUG, then you can strip that profiling stuff from the final product. How complicated oof is doesn't matter, as long as it doesn't change what the program does. –  Potatoswatter Jan 31 '13 at 1:15

In ToBase switch this:

do { buf[len++] = tbl[n % base]; } while(n /= base);

with this:

do { buf[len++] = tbl[n % base]; n = (n/base) - 1; } while(n >= 0);
share|improve this answer

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