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I was experimenting with the the Type.GetMethod method the other day when I ran into a problem.

My program is a Windows application. There is one textbox in the form used for output and there are only these two blocks of code in the Form1_Load method:

   MethodInfo info2 = typeof(IEnumerable<int>).GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
   textBox1.Text += info2.ToString();

   MethodInfo info1 = typeof(IEnumerator<int>).GetMethod("MoveNext");
   textBox1.Text += info1.ToString();

The first GetMethod returned the correct information, but the second one returned nothing.

So I went one step further and included a try/catch statement in the code:

        try
        {
            MethodInfo info2 = typeof(IEnumerable<int>).GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
            textBox1.Text += info2.ToString();

            MethodInfo info1 = typeof(IEnumerator<int>).GetMethod("MoveNext");
            textBox1.Text += info1.ToString();
        }
        catch (Exception v)
        {
            textBox1.Text += v.Message;
        }

The second GetMethod now gives me the error:

Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

I am confused. Neither method is static and neither takes any parameter. Why does MoveNext return the error while GetEnumerator doesn't?

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1  
When I run your code typeof(String).GetMethod("ToString"); throws an AmbiguousMatchException, which makes sense because the String class has two overloads for the ToString method. –  BACON Jan 31 '13 at 0:52
    
check stackoverflow.com/questions/6472980/… –  spajce Jan 31 '13 at 0:54
    
@BACON My bad. I was actually running the same test on IEnumerable<int>.GetEnumerator and IEnumerator<int>.MoveNext and had the two mixed up. I will edit my question. –  deutschZuid Jan 31 '13 at 0:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is because the interface IEnumerator<T> does not have a definition for MoveNext, that is in the interface IEnumerator.

Example:

   MethodInfo info1 = typeof(IEnumerator).GetMethod("MoveNext");
   textBox1.Text += info1.ToString();

This will work fine,

You can loop though the Interfaces assigned to IEnumerator<T> and find MoveNext

MethodInfo info1 = typeof(IEnumerator<int>).GetInterfaces()
                  .Where(i => i.GetMethod("MoveNext") != null)
                  .Select(m => m.GetMethod("MoveNext"))
                  .FirstOrDefault();
textBox1.Text += info1 != null ? info1.ToString() : string.Empty;
share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean to say IEnumerator<T> does not have a def for MoveNext (because that's what I have). However your solution is correct. I imported System.Collections into my code and removed the <int> part and it now works. –  deutschZuid Jan 31 '13 at 1:21
    
well getting Method info for Generic Interface is a little complicated, for non generic it will be fine always! –  PaRiMaL RaJ Jan 31 '13 at 1:22
    
Thanks AppDeveloper. Learn something everyday. –  deutschZuid Jan 31 '13 at 1:22
    
that is ok! but i still want to get the info for generic one! –  PaRiMaL RaJ Jan 31 '13 at 1:24
    
Ahh.. yes sorry for the typos. –  sa_ddam213 Jan 31 '13 at 1:25

I saw this:

but the second one returned nothing.

That means the second line of the second pair, it's like you were trying to do this:

null.ToString();

That's where the exception comes from, not the line above it. You can't use properties or methods of a null object like that.

share|improve this answer
    
hi Joel. Sorry I mixed up a few things. I've re-edited my Q. –  deutschZuid Jan 31 '13 at 1:00

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