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This works.

var a = 'ontouchstart' in window;
for (;;) {
  console.log(a);
  break;
}

This causes syntax error. Why?

for (var a = 'ontouchstart' in window;;) {
  console.log(a);
  break;
}

This works.

for (var a = ('ontouchstart' in window);;) {
  console.log(a);
  break;
}
share|improve this question
    
The problem is some interpreter confusion over for..in and prop in obj, but I don't know exactly what it is. I'll do a little ECMAScript [grammar spelunking]ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-12.6.4) and see if I can find anything useful. –  apsillers Jan 31 '13 at 1:24
1  
@apsillers: It seems curious to me that both = and ;; don't make the intention clear to the interpreter. –  pdknsk Jan 31 '13 at 1:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This causes syntax error. Why?

To avoid confusion with for-in-loops. The syntax specification for for-loops is explicit:

IterationStatement : for ( ExpressionNoInopt; Expressionopt; Expressionopt) Statement

IterationStatement : for ( var VariableDeclarationListNoIn ; Expressionopt; Expressionopt) Statement

This NoIn suffix spreads through the whole syntactic grammar, and ends in the 11.8 Relational Operators (Syntax) section:

RelationalExpression :

ShiftExpression
RelationalExpression < ShiftExpression
RelationalExpression > ShiftExpression
RelationalExpression <= ShiftExpression
RelationalExpression >= ShiftExpression
RelationalExpression instanceof ShiftExpression
RelationalExpression in ShiftExpression

RelationalExpressionNoIn :

ShiftExpression
RelationalExpressionNoIn < ShiftExpression
RelationalExpressionNoIn > ShiftExpression
RelationalExpressionNoIn <= ShiftExpression
RelationalExpressionNoIn >= ShiftExpression
RelationalExpressionNoIn instanceof ShiftExpression

NOTE: The NoIn variants are needed to avoid confusing the in operator in a relational expression with the in operator in a for statement.

However, I don't understand myself why the NoIn variants are used in the normal for-loop - they are reasonable in for-in-productions. I'd guess it's to avoid confusion of the programmer and to simplify parsers.

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1  
If I understand the note correctly, this is meant to avoid confusing the learning programmer, not the interpreter (which should be able to figure it out because of ;;), right? –  pdknsk Jan 31 '13 at 1:48
    
@pdknsk: Yes, I have spent some time figuring out whether the two semicolons were allowed in the LeftHandSideExpression/VariableDeclarationNoIn of for-in-loops (afaict no), and came to the same conclusion –  Bergi Jan 31 '13 at 1:53

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