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I am designing a fishtank. The entire background of the page is the water. I want to set a function that changes the water from blue to brown after 5000 milliseconds and then pauses. The user would then click a button to "clean the tank" which would reset the background changing function.

The only solutions I can find are loops that continue to change the background from blue to green.

var intPgColorIndex = 0;
var arrPgColor = new Array("#999966", "#00ffff" );
function SetPgColor()
{
var PgColor;
intPgColorIndex++;
if (intPgColorIndex >= arrPgColor.length)


{
intPgColorIndex = 0;
}
PgColor = arrPgColor[intPgColorIndex];
if (PgColor = "#999966" ) {
 document.body.style.backgroundColor = PgColor;
 setTimeout("SetPgColor()", 5000);
 }


  };
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1  
Why don't you show what you found. –  epascarello Jan 31 '13 at 2:48
    
Sounds great. Can't wait to see your code. –  Steve Wellens Jan 31 '13 at 2:48
2  
Trouble here if (PgColor = "#999966" ) { must be ==, and here setTimeout("SetPgColor()",, better use setTimeout(SetPgColor, –  elclanrs Jan 31 '13 at 2:56
    
aside from the way you change color, you have the right idea. iterative ajax, for example, is a time loop. don't shy away from that. –  Dave Alperovich Jan 31 '13 at 3:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only part that's stopping your code from running as expected is that you are using = instead of == to compare values.

However, your code is ugly and bad, so here's a better version:

setTimeout(function dirty() {
    document.body.style.backgroundColor = "#996";
    var btn = document.body.appendChild(document.createElement('button'));
    btn.appendChild(document.createTextNode("Clean the tank"));
    btn.onclick = function clean() {
        btn.parentNode.removeChild(btn);
        document.body.style.backgroundColor = "#0ff";
        setTimeout(dirty,5000);
    };
},5000);
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Thank you so much. I'm still in the process of learning, so my code is probably a headache to look at! I really appreciate your help! :) –  Jennifer Jan 31 '13 at 3:14
function clean() {
  clearTimeout(dirt);
  var dirt = setTimeout(dirt, 5000)
  //set color to blue
}
function dirt() {
  //set color to brown
}

Call clean at the start of your program, and have it executed when the user clicks a button or something. It will wait 5 seconds (a bit short imo) and then runs the dirt function. Nothing will happen until the user clicks the button at which point the tank is cleaned and then waits 5 seconds again before becoming dirty again. Simple, clean and effective. :D

share|improve this answer
    
Having a variable and a function with the same name would be a bit confusing. I'd recommend renaming one of them. Perhaps var timer instead? –  Chris Barr Jan 31 '13 at 3:25
    
Well yes I would use dirtTimer or something, I didn't realize I used the same thing twice. You can tell its 3:30am :P –  jimjimmy1995 Jan 31 '13 at 3:29

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