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1.

function MyConstructor() {}
var myobject = new MyConstructor();
MyConstructor.prototype = {protest:"maizere"};

[ myobject instanceof MyConstructor,     // false !
myobject.constructor == MyConstructor, // true !
myobject instanceof Object ]           // true
console.log(myobject.protest)          //undefined

This proves that myobject does not inherit properties and method from MyConstructor prototype anymore.

But see next code below:

2.

function MyConstructor() {}
var myobject = new MyConstructor();
MyConstructor.prototype.protest= "Maizere";//Do this line gets hoisted?or something else

[ myobject instanceof MyConstructor,     // true!
myobject.constructor == MyConstructor, // true !
myobject instanceof Object ]           // true
console.log(myobject.protest)          //Maizere

Why is this happening?what is the exact definition of internal prototype?This also proves even after the instantiation of the object , proto is refering to MyConstructor prototype.If so than why the first(1.) code not referring to MyConstructor prototype? since the property is being added after the instantiation of an object in the second code and the internal prototype of the object receives it ,this means we can change the prototype properties later and still see the effect in the instance .But same definition is not working when prototype properties is replaced in the first code?

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Read: .prototype and instanceof –  Matt Ball Jan 31 '13 at 3:49
    
Using new sets up a relationship between the new object, and the current .prototype of the constructor. That relationship does not change if you give the .prototype of the constructor a new object. –  the system Jan 31 '13 at 4:43

3 Answers 3

I might be wrong with this but it looks like when you do:

MyConstructor.prototype = {protest:"maizere"};

You're overriding your prototype with an anonymous object definition, thus when you just add a new property like:

MyConstructor.prototype.protest= {"Maizere"};

Your class keeps its prototype and it works like a charm.

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1  
MyConstructor.prototype.protest= {"Maizere"}; is not valid syntax, so I assume you mean MyConstructor.prototype.protest= "Maizere"; –  Explosion Pills Jan 31 '13 at 4:07

MyConstructor.prototype = overwrites the entire prototype object.

The instanceof operator tests whether an object has in its prototype chain the prototype property of a constructor

http://jsfiddle.net/ExplosionPIlls/xtqhp/

function MyConstructor () {}
MyConstructor.prototype = {'xyz': 'zyx'};
//true
console.log((new MyConstructor) instanceof MyConstructor);

function MyConstructor2 () {}
var mc2 = new MyConstructor2;
MyConstructor2.prototype = {'xyz': 'zyx'};
//false
console.log(mc2 instanceof MyConstructor2);

By the way, MyConstructor.prototype.protest = {"Maizere"}; is not valid syntax.

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even if the Prototype object is completely replaced as per the second code either it still have reference to MyConstructor prototype which is now a normal object or this line MyConstructor.prototype.protest = "Maizere"; gets hoisted –  Maizere Pathak Jan 31 '13 at 3:58
    
since the property is being added after the instantiation of an object ,the internal prototype of the object receives it ,this means we can change the prototype properties later and still see the effect in the instance .But same definition is not working when prototype properties is replaced? –  Maizere Pathak Jan 31 '13 at 4:06

So, this is one of the reasons I have this article bookmarked:

Constructors Considered Mildly Confusing

Basically, what's happening in the first block of code is that you're overwriting MyConstructor's prototype object with a new object. Whereas, in the second block, you're adding a property to the existing prototype object.

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Does the newly added properties gets hoisted ? –  Maizere Pathak Jan 31 '13 at 3:58
    
since we are adding the properties after the instantiation of the object. –  Maizere Pathak Jan 31 '13 at 4:02

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