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Let's say I have 2 commits in my git log. Now I want to go back to the first commit and modify some files and add that as the third commit. When I type in git log I want 3 commits to be there on the same branch. git reset --soft firstcommit and then commiting again wipes my second commit. How do I achieve what I want?

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can you describe what is the log like finally? –  pktangyue Jan 31 '13 at 3:54
    
I want the log to have first commit, second commit as well as the third commit entries. But in git it just shows me the first and third commit –  user1667307 Jan 31 '13 at 4:01
    
What from the first commit do you want? The changes it introduced or the state of it’s files? Do you want this third commit do undo the changes that were applied in the second commit. –  Chronial Jan 31 '13 at 4:12
    
Lets say I just realized I want to add a new feature and it would be easier to do so from the first commit, I want to go back to the first commit add the feature and commit it . But I dont want the second commit to be lost as that has some other features that third commit doesnt have. I know that this isnt a perfect example but I guess it explains the situation –  user1667307 Jan 31 '13 at 4:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Suppose you are now at thirdcommit.

You can use git cherry-pick secondcommit to get it back.

And the log will be

firstcommit -> thirdcommit -> secondcommit

If you want the log to be like:

firstcommit -> secondcommit -> thridcommit

you can do :

git reset --hard secondcommit
git cherry-pick thridcommit
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I dont know the sha of the second commit as it isnt displayed in the git log –  user1667307 Jan 31 '13 at 4:32
    
you can use git reflog to find it. –  pktangyue Jan 31 '13 at 5:18

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