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I'm trying to create a simple example php script, there is a user class and then two controllers.

Imagine it as an MVC with no view.

At the moment I cannot get getUserId() to work within showUserId() in usercontroller, what am I doing wrong?

PHP

<?
class user{

    function getUserId(){

        return 1; //Simple Example
    }
}

class controller{

    function __construct(){

        $user = new User();
    }
}

class usercontroller extends controller{

    function __construct(){

        $user = new User();
    }

    function showUserId() {

        echo $user->getUserId();
    }
}
?>
share|improve this question
    
you should define $user as a property: public $user; then your constructor should be $this->user = new User(); –  kennypu Jan 31 '13 at 4:02
    
... and subsequently $this->user->getUserId() –  Michael Berkowski Jan 31 '13 at 4:03
    
This is an easy mistake to make if you're coming from a Java or C++ background. –  Ja͢ck Jan 31 '13 at 4:05
1  
Why would controller need to know about a user object? –  Ja͢ck Jan 31 '13 at 4:13
    
@jack good point –  Silver89 Jan 31 '13 at 4:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
class usercontroller extends controller{

    private $user;

    function __construct(){

        $this->user = new User();
    }

    function showUserId() {

        echo $this->user->getUserId();
    }
}

You need to define the $user as class attribute of the controller class, define it in constructor, then you can use it in all functions..

Edit;

Yes you can define in oarent and call parent's constructor in child constructor, and use it..

<?
class user{   
    function getUserId(){    
        return 1; //Simple Example
    }
}

class controller{
    protected $user;
    function __construct(){    
        $this->user = new User();
    }
}

class usercontroller extends controller{

    function __construct(){
        parent::__construct();
        //$user = new User();
    }

    function showUserId() {    
        echo $this->user->getUserId();
    }
}

$controller_instance = new usercontroller();
$controller_instance->showUserId();    
?>
share|improve this answer
    
private visibility would be better here. –  Ja͢ck Jan 31 '13 at 4:05
    
yeah..you are right..one don't want to have direct access to vars, have getters, setters.. –  Rajat Singhal Jan 31 '13 at 4:07
    
Is it possible to declare the private $user; in controller and then access it in usercontoller? –  Silver89 Jan 31 '13 at 4:07
    
Actually ... Silver89 brings up a good point; it should be defined inside controller and set to protected in that case. –  Ja͢ck Jan 31 '13 at 4:09
    
Would you need to use parent::__construct(); ? Surely the parent is always constructed? –  Silver89 Jan 31 '13 at 4:42

$user is only available in the __construct scope. To be available in the object scope it has to be bound to the object as a member:

$this->user = new User;

Then, you can access $this->user.

It is also recommended to include this member as part of the class definition not only for clarity but also to set the correct access modifier.

share|improve this answer

In your code example, $user exists as a local variable in the __construct() function.

If you want it to be a part of the class first define a class property with that name, then you can reference it by using the $this-> syntax.

class usercontroller extends controller {
    public $user;

    function __construct(){
        $this->user = new User();
    }

    function showUserId() {
        echo $this->user->getUserId();
    }
}

As a nit picky side note, your 'User' class is defined as 'user' in your code example. I'm sure you intended those to match as you weren't asking about parse errors with your script.

share|improve this answer
    
private visibility would be better here. –  Ja͢ck Jan 31 '13 at 4:06

I would take out the $user variable from controller, because I don't feel it really belongs there:

class controller
{
}

Then, inside usercontroller I would pass a user object as a dependency:

class usercontroller extends controller
{
    private $user;

    function __construct(User $user)
    {
        $this->user = $user;
    }

    public function showUserId() 
    {
        echo $this->user->getUserId();
    }
}

$c = new usercontroller(new User());
echo $c->showUserId();
share|improve this answer
    
What's the reason behind using public function showUserId() rather than calling echo $this->user->getUserId(); directly? –  Silver89 Jan 31 '13 at 4:26
    
@Silver89 Calling it directly from where? –  Ja͢ck Jan 31 '13 at 4:36
    
I got a little confused with that, question updated –  Silver89 Jan 31 '13 at 5:29
    
@Silver89 Regarding the updated question (that you later removed), the user must be passed into the model's constructor. –  Ja͢ck Jan 31 '13 at 6:35
    
that tweaked with me after a good half an hour of looking over the code, thanks for the help! –  Silver89 Jan 31 '13 at 14:49

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