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---This is a Homework question---

I'm having problems reading float values from a text file using fscanf.

Basically I'm trying to read float values from a file and store them in a dynamic array. The input file has two floats per line. so a line might be "0.85 7.34" (w/o quotes). so I'm trying to use fscanf(fp, "%f %f", &coordinates[i], &coordinates[i++]) to read in the 2 float values. when i print it shows as 0.00000. Below is the code I wrote and the output it produces.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main (int argc, char *argv []) {

FILE * fp = fopen("nums", "r");

float *coordinates;
float *tmp;
int i = 0;
int ARRAY_SIZE = 5;
coordinates = malloc(5*sizeof(float));

while (fscanf(fp,"%f %f", &coordinates[i], &coordinates[i++]) > 1)
{

  printf("iteration# %d | coord1 = %f coord2 = %f \n", i, &coordinates[i-1], &coordinates[i]);

  if (i >= ARRAY_SIZE)
  {
    tmp = realloc(coordinates, (i*2)*sizeof(float));
    coordinates = tmp;
    ARRAY_SIZE = i*2;
  }
  i++;
}

for(i = 0; i < 8; i++)
  printf("%f\n", &coordinates[i]);


return 0;
}

OUTPUT:

iteration# 1 | coord1 = 0.000000 coord2 = 0.000000 
iteration# 3 | coord1 = 0.000000 coord2 = 0.000000 
iteration# 5 | coord1 = 0.000000 coord2 = 0.000000 
iteration# 7 | coord1 = 0.000000 coord2 = 0.000000 
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000  
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1  
Careful. fscanf(fp,"%f %f", &coordinates[i], &coordinates[i++]) is undefined behavior, because you're not guaranteed if coordinates[i] is evaluated before or after coordinates[i++], so you could be mixing things up (since i may not be incremented when you think it is)! Order of evaluation of args is not specified. –  Cornstalks Jan 31 '13 at 4:19
    
so you mean i could be incremented before coordinates[i] is evaluated? –  tgaleman Jan 31 '13 at 4:20
    
Yeah, that's possible. Plus, you probably wanted ++i instead of i++ (assuming the arguments were evaluated in the order you wanted, which they're not). There's a difference in C between pre and post-increment. Actually, maybe what you really wanted was i++ on both of them. But still, order of evaluation is undefined. –  Cornstalks Jan 31 '13 at 4:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't use the "address of"-operator & with printf. fscanf requires a pointer to the data so it knows can change the variables value, while printf does not.

Change:

printf("iteration# %d | coord1 = %f coord2 = %f \n", i, &coordinates[i-1], &coordinates[i]);

To:

printf("iteration# %d | coord1 = %f coord2 = %f \n", i, coordinates[i-1], coordinates[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks that worked, I can't believe i spent so much time on such a simple thing. –  tgaleman Jan 31 '13 at 4:27

First problem:

 while (fscanf(fp,"%f %f", &coordinates[i], &coordinates[i++]) > 1)

you're trying to use the value of i in &coordinates[i] and modify it in &coordinates[i++] without an intervening sequence point. The behavior on doing so is undefined, and most likely won't be doing what you want. Use &coordinates[i+1] for the second argument. Note this means you'll have to update i in the loop with i += 2 or similar. Note that it's not guaranteed that &coordinates[i] is evaluated before &coordinates[i++].

Second problem:

printf("%f\n", &coordinates[i]);

Again, you've invoked undefined behavior; you've told printf to expect a value of type float, but you're passing a value of type float *. Lose the &. scanf and printf are not symmetrical in this respect.

Head-scratchers:

You know there are going to be 2 values per line, but you start your array size at 5 (rather than 4 or 6 or 8). You allow for resizing the array (correctly, I might add), but you've hardcoded a size of 8 for the print loop, rather than using the actual number of items read.

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