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Is this code is completely valid? Will returning a pointer here will not throw us to undefined behavior?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int* lab(int* i) {
        int k=9;
        i=&k;
        return i;
}

int main(void) {
        int* i=0;
        cout << *lab(i) << endl;
        return 0;
}

EDIT: how valid code can look like?

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No sir. That is not valid. You can't return a pointer to a local variable. Once lab() exits k does not exist and dereferencing a pointer to it causes undefined behavior.

Think about where k is stored. Automatic variables that you take the address of are stored on the stack. The stack grows when functions are entered and shrinks when they exit. When lab() returns the stack space that was allocated to k is reclaimed and can be reused by the runtime, possibly for other local variables in some other functions.

There are a couple of ways to fix this. The easiest is to have the caller provide a location to store the value in rather than having lab() try to find space. This eliminates the problem of k being deallocated when lab() returns.

int* lab(int* i) {
    *i = 9;
    return i;
}

int main(void) {
    int k;
    cout << *lab(&k) << endl;
    return 0;
}

Another way is to declare k as static. Static variables are stored in permanent storage somewhere, not on the stack, so their addresses remain valid throughout the lifetime of the program.

int* lab() {
    static int k=9;
    return &k;
}

And yet another way is to allocate memory on the heap using new.

int* lab() {
    int* i = new int;
    *i = 9;
    return i;
}

int main(void) {
    int* i = lab();
    cout << *i << endl;
    delete i;
    return 0;
}
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oh... i see. i'm newbie in c++. pointers make me nuts, sorry :) –  skater_nex Jan 31 '13 at 4:30
    
Thanks. Now I get it. The same problem with reference, right? I mean there is no difference between returning a pointer or reference in this case? Sorry for the noob question. –  skater_nex Jan 31 '13 at 4:40
1  
@skater_nex: In this case, there is a slight difference. If you pass an int in by reference, you can't reseat it to reference k. You can assign to it the value of k, but it will still be referencing the int that was passed in, and is thus perfectly safe to return. But if you declared a reference in the function, initialized with k, you could not, safely, return it by reference. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 31 '13 at 4:43
    
ok. now i'm better understand this problem, thanks a lot. It's better send a reference and return a pointer when dealing with functions –  skater_nex Jan 31 '13 at 4:53
    
@John: I edited the answer a bit. Hope that is okay with you. :-) –  Nawaz Jan 31 '13 at 4:56
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int k will be deleted when the function returns. Hence i will point to an unallocated part of memory. ERROR

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FYI int * i = 0 will make i point to 0x00000000 in memory. not set the value of the int to 0. –  Mr Universe Jan 31 '13 at 4:27
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No it is not valid. lab returns a pointer to a variable local variable. That pointer is not valid once lab exists. Access it is undefined behavior.

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