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I am using the following code

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
System.out.println("Before "+cal.getTime());
cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, 01);
System.out.println("After "+cal.getTime());

the output is

Before Thu Jan 31 10:07:34 IST 2013
After Sun Mar 03 10:07:34 IST 2013

for adding +1 to jan is giving mar month. may be it returning correct output if we add 30 days to present date. but i want to show feb month. can any body help me please..

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

you can see the +1 to set field is adding 30 days date different to your dates(observed from your output.)

if you want months then use the code

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
System.out.println("Before "+cal.getTime());  //Before Thu Jan 31 10:16:23 IST 2013

cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
System.out.println("After "+cal.getTime()); //After Thu Feb 28 10:16:23 IST 2013
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You have to use add() like,

cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);

OUTPUT ->

Before Thu Jan 31 10:15:04 IST 2013
After Thu Feb 28 10:15:04 IST 2013
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cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, cal.get( Calendar.MONTH ) + 1 );

The reason it shows Mar 3 anyway, is because it apparently adds 30 days, which is Feb 31st which does not exist, so it goes to Mar 3.

If you wanted the last day of the next month instead, you would do something like this:

int month = cal.get( Calendar.MONTH );
cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, cal.get(Calendar.MONTH) + 1);
if( cal.get( month ) > month + 1 ) {
    cal.set( Calendar.MONTH, month + 1 );
    cal.set( Calendar.DAY, /* here comes your day amount finding algorithm */ );
}
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2  
This would have the same effect. 0 + 1 = 1, which is what the OP already passes to set(). –  Eric Jan 31 '13 at 4:47

This kind of date-time work is easier using either:

  • Joda-Time 2.3 library
    • Popular replacement for the java.util.Date & .Calendar classes bundled with Java
    • Open source
    • Free of cost
    • Actively maintained (as of 2014-02)
  • java.time package

Example Code

DateTimeZone timeZone = DateTimeZone.forID( "Europe/Paris" ); // Or, DateTimeZone.UTC
DateTime dateTime = new DateTime( timeZone );
DateTime monthAgo = dateTime.plusMonths( -1 ); // Smartly handles various month lengths, leap year, and so on.
DateTime monthLater = dateTime.plusMonths( 1 );

Dump to console…

System.out.println( "dateTime: " + dateTime );
System.out.println( "monthAgo: " + monthAgo );
System.out.println( "monthAgo start of day: " + monthAgo.withTimeAtStartOfDay() );
System.out.println( "monthLater: " + monthLater );

When run…

dateTime: 2014-02-24T01:53:22.386+01:00
monthAgo: 2014-01-24T01:53:22.386+01:00
monthAgo start of day: 2014-01-24T00:00:00.000+01:00
monthLater: 2014-03-24T01:53:22.386+01:00
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